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Department of Human Services (DHS) Division of Addiction Services (DAS) Information Systems ... - page 13 / 21

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LEVEL III.1 – CLINICALLLY MANAGED LOW-INTENSITY RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT.

Status characterized by  any of the following:

a.

Acknowledge the existence of a psychiatric condition and/or substance use problem and is sufficiently ready and cooperative enough to respond to low-intensity residential treatment; OR

b.

due to early stage of readiness to change, needed engagement and motivational strategies can be provided via Level III.1 plus augmentation by additional Level I or II serves; OR

c.

A 24-hour structured milieu is required to promote treatment progress and recovery, because motivating interventions have failed in the past and are assessed as not likely to succeed in the future in an outpatient setting; OR

d.

Impaired ability to make behavior changes without repeated, structured motivational interventions in a 24-hour milieu.

LEVEL III.1 – Dual Diagnosis Enhanced

Meets criteria for Level III.1 plus any of the following:

a.

Ambivalent regarding commitment to address a co-occurring mental health problem; OR

b.

Lack of consistent follow-through with treatment due to emotional behavioral, or cognitive problem; OR

c.

Minimal awareness of a problem, or being unaware of the need to change requiring active interventions with family, significant others, and other external systems to create incentives and align incentives so as to promote engagement in treatment.

LEVEL III.3 – CLINICALLY MANAGED MEDIUM-INTENSITY RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT

Status characterized by (a) and any of the following:

a.

Treatment interventions available in a moderately intense residential setting can be expected to increase the resident’s degree of readiness to change; AND

b.

Limited readiness to change because the intensity and chronicity of the addictive disorder or cognitive limitations preclude much awareness of the need for continued care, the existence of substance abuse/mental health problem(s), or the need for treatment; OR

c.

Marked difficulty understanding the relationship between substance use, addiction, mental health or life problems, and impaired coping skills or level of functioning despite a history of serious consequences; OR

d.

Continued substance use poses a danger of harm to self or others, but there is no demonstrated awareness of the need to address the severity of addictions or psychiatric problems or the need for treatment; OR

e.

Impaired ability to make behavior changes without repeated, structured, clinically directed intervention delivered in a 24-hour milieu.

LEVEL III.3 – Dual Diagnosis Enhanced

Meets criteria for Level III.3 plus (a) or (b):

a.

a. Ambivalence in commitment to address a co-occurring mental health problem; OR

b.

Inability to consistently follow through with treatment due to mental condition, or related lack of awareness of a problem, or the need to change requires active interventions with family, significant others, and other external systems to create and align incentives.

LEVEL III.5 – CLINICALLLY MANAGED HIGH-INTENSITY RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT.

Status characterized by (a) and any of (b) through (f):

a.

Treatment interventions available in a structure 24-hour programmatic milieu can be expected to increase readiness to change; AND

b.

Manifests little awareness of the need for continuing care, the existence of a substance use or mental health problem, or need for treatmentt; OR

c.

Has marked difficulty understanding the relationship between substance use, addiction, mental health or life problems, and impaired coping skills or level of functioning. Often blames others for problems; OR

d.

Demonstrated opposition to addressing the severity of addiction or mental health problem(s); OR

e.

Does not recognize the need for treatment even though continued substance use or inability to follow through with mental health treatment poses a danger of harm to self or others; OR

f.

Motivational interventions have failed at less intensive levels of care and are not likely to succeed at such lower levels at this time; OR

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