X hits on this document

PDF document

Coated Free Sheet Paper From China, Indonesia, and Korea - page 143 / 198

817 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

143 / 198

sroberts on PROD1PC70 with NOTICES

Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 227 / Monday, November

27, 2006 / Notices

68547

more than 50 percent of the total production of the domestic like product, the Department shall: (i) Poll the industry or rely on other information in order to determine if there is support for the petition, as required by subparagraph (A), or (ii) determine industry support using a statistically valid sampling method.

Section 771(4)(A) of the Act defines the ‘‘industry’’ as the producers as a whole of a domestic like product. Thus, to determine whether the petition has the requisite industry support, the statute directs the Department to look to producers and workers who produce the domestic like product. The International Trade Commission (ITC) is responsible for determining whether ‘‘the domestic industry’’ has been injured and must also determine what constitutes a domestic like product in order to define the industry. While the Department and the ITC must apply the same statutory definition regarding the domestic like product, they do so for different purposes and pursuant to separate and distinct authority. See Section 771(10) of the Act. In addition, the Departments determination is subject to limitations of time and information. Although this may result in different definitions of the domestic like product, such differences do not render the decision of either agency contrary to law.1

Section 771(10) of the Act defines the domestic like product as ‘‘a product which is like, or in the absence of like, most similar in characteristics and uses with, the article subject to an investigation under this subtitle.’’ Thus, the reference point from which the domestic like product analysis begins is ‘‘the article subject to an investigation,’’ i.e., the class or kind of merchandise to be investigated, which normally will be the scope as defined in the petition.

With regard to domestic like product, petitioner does not offer a definition of domestic like product distinct from the scope of the investigations. Based on our analysis of the information presented by petitioner, we have determined that there is a single domestic like product, coated free sheet paper, which is defined in the ‘‘Scope of Investigations’’ section above, and we have analyzed industry support in terms of the domestic like product.

On November 15 and 16, 2006, we received submissions on behalf of Chinese and Indonesian producers of CFS questioning the industry support calculation. See ‘‘Office of AD/CVD

See USEC, Inc. v. United States, 25 CIT 49, 5556, 132 F. Supp. 2d 1, 78 (Jan. 24, 2001) (citing Algoma Steel Corp. v. United States, 12 CIT 518, 523, 688 F. Supp. 639, 64244 (June 8, 1988)). 1

Operations Initiation Checklist for the Countervailing Duty Petition on Coated Free Sheet Paper from Indonesia,’’ at Attachment II (Nov. 20, 2006) (Indonesia CVD Initiation Checklist), ‘‘Office of AD/CVD Operations Initiation Checklist for the Countervailing Duty Petition on Coated Free Sheet Paper from the Republic of Korea,’’ at Attachment II (Nov. 20, 2006) (Korea CVD Initiation Checklist), and ‘‘Office of AD/CVD Operations Initiation Checklist for the Countervailing Duty Petition on Coated Free Sheet Paper from the Peoples Republic of the PRC,’’ at Attachment II (Nov. 20, 2006) (PRC CVD Initiation Checklist), on file in the CRU. Our review of the data provided in the petition, supplemental submissions, and other information readily available to the Department indicate that petitioner has established industry support representing at least 25 percent of the total production of the domestic like product; and more than 50 percent of the production of the domestic like product produced by that portion of the industry expressing support for or opposition to the petition, requiring no further action by the Department pursuant to section 702(c)(4)(D) of the Act. Therefore, the domestic producers (or workers) who support the petition account for at least 25 percent of the total production of the domestic like product, and the requirements of section 702(c)(4)(A)(i) of the Act are met. Furthermore, the domestic producers who support the petition account for more than 50 percent of the production of the domestic like product produced by that portion of the industry expressing support for, or opposition to, the petition. Thus, the requirements of section 702(c)(4)(A)(ii) of the Act also are met. Accordingly, the Department determines that the petition was filed on behalf of the domestic industry within the meaning of section 702(b)(1) of the Act. See Indonesia CVD Initiation Checklist at Attachment II, Korea CVD Initiation Checklist at Attachment II, and PRC CVD Initiation Checklist at Attachment II.

Injury Test

Because the PRC, Indonesia and Korea are each a ‘‘Subsidies Agreement Country’’ within the meaning of section 701(b) of the Act, section 701(a)(2) of the Act applies to these investigations. Accordingly, the ITC must determine whether imports of the subject merchandise from the PRC, Indonesia and Korea materially injure, or threaten material injury to, a U.S. industry.

Allegations and Evidence of Material Injury and Causation

Petitioner alleges that the U.S. industry producing the domestic like product is being materially injured, or is threatened with material injury, by reason of the individual and cumulated allegedly subsidized imports of the subject merchandise from Indonesia, the PRC, and Korea. With regard to the PRC and Korea, the allegedly subsidized imports exceed the negligibility threshold provided for under section 771(24)(A) of the Act. With respect to Indonesia, while the allegedly subsidized imports from Indonesia do not meet the statutory requirement of four percent over the most recent 12- month period for which import data are available, in its analysis for threat (see section 771(24)(B) of the Act), petitioner alleges and provides supporting evidence that these imports will imminently account for more than four percent of all CFS imports of the subject merchandise and, therefore, are not negligible. See section 771(24)(A)(iv) of the Act.

Petitioner contends that the industrys injury is evidenced by reduced market share, increased inventories, reduced shipments, lost sales, reduced production, lower capacity and capacity utilization rates, decline in prices, lost revenue, reduced employment, and a decline in financial performance. The allegations of injury and causation are supported by relevant evidence including U.S. Customs import data, lost sales, and pricing information. We have assessed the allegations and supporting evidence regarding material injury and causation and have determined that these allegations are properly supported by adequate evidence and meet the statutory requirements for initiation. See PRC CVD Initiation Checklist, Indonesia CVD Initiation Checklist, and Korea CVD Initiation Checklist.

Initiation of Countervailing Duty Investigations

Section 702(b) of the Act requires the Department to initiate a countervailing duty proceeding whenever an interested party files a petition on behalf of an industry that (1) alleges the elements necessary for an imposition of a duty under section 701(a) of the Act and (2) is accompanied by information reasonably available to petitioner supporting the allegations. The Department has examined the countervailing duty petitions on CFS from the PRC, Indonesia, and Korea and found that they comply with the requirements of section 702(b) of the

VerDate Aug<31>2005

16:58 Nov 24, 2006

Jkt 211001

PO 00000

Frm 00019

Fmt 4703

Sfmt 4703

E:\FR\FM\27NON1.SGM

27NON1

Document info
Document views817
Page views817
Page last viewedSat Dec 10 09:22:04 UTC 2016
Pages198
Paragraphs7125
Words78899

Comments