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Coated Free Sheet Paper From China, Indonesia, and Korea - page 81 / 198

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PART IV: U.S. IMPORTS, APPARENT CONSUMPTION, AND MARKET SHARES

U.S. IMPORTERS

The subject product is imported by a variety of mill agents, independent brokers, and paper merchants. In some instances, trading companies sell subject paper to paper merchants that are themselves importers, resulting in the potential for the double-counting of reported imports.1 Importer questionnaires were sent to 74 firms identified in Customs documents under the HTS reporting numbers identified in the petition (and subsequently in Commerce’s initiation notices) as having imported CFS paper from any source from January 2003 through July 2006.2 An additional 46 questionnaires were sent to firms only identified in the petition as importing the subject merchandise as well as to all U.S. producers. Of these firms, 42 returned questionnaires3 while about 20 firms (primarily those listed only in the petition) indicated that they did not, in fact, import CFS paper, although they may have purchased it.

As shown both in Customs documents and in table IV-1, a relatively small number of importers accounted for the majority of U.S. imports of CFS paper from the subject sources. The most substantial U.S. importers of subject merchandise from China during January 2003 to July 2006 in order of the value of their U.S. imports recorded in Customs documents were: ***. ***4 accounted for the bulk of U.S. subject imports from Indonesia during the period examined. As discussed in the notes to table IV-1, most subject merchandise from Indonesia was imported by ***5 until ***; from *** onward subject merchandise was almost entirely sold in the U.S. market through ***. The most substantial U.S. importers of subject merchandise from Korea during 2003-05 in terms of volume were: ***.

Table IV-1 Coated free sheet paper: U.S. importers’ reported subject U.S. imports in 2005, shares of the value of reported subject U.S. imports, parent firm(s), and identified foreign manufacturer(s)

******* MISCLASSIFICATION OF THE SUBJECT MERCHANDISE

A comparison of the quantity and value of U.S. imports compiled from questionnaire data to official Commerce statistics for the HTS reporting numbers listed in the petition (and which were used to compile the Customs documents used for the mailing lists)6 shows that questionnaire data substantially

1 ***, for example, stated in its importer questionnaire response (question I-7) that it was “not able to determine whether its purchasers were the consignee {in Customs documents} on some or all of the transactions during the period in question.”

2

Customs documents were available only through July 2006.

3 A number of firms were shown in both Customs documents and in the petition as operating at multiple addresses. In order to ensure that the questionnaire would actually be received by the branch best able to provide a response, Commission staff in most instances mailed to each address shown. Therefore, any comparison of the number of responses received to the questionnaires mailed out does not necessarily provide a good measure of the response rate or the responsiveness of the industry.

4

***.

5

***.

6 According to the petition, almost all CFS paper is “currently” entered under these HTS items and, further, the items do not include more than very minor volumes of nonsubject merchandise. Petition, p. 4.

IV-1

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