X hits on this document

66 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

5 / 23

Maternal and Child Health Bureau ~ 5

TERMS USED TO DESCRIBE PREMATURITY AND BIRTHWEIGHT

Term

Used to describe

Premature

Infants born before 38 weeks gestation

Low birth weight (LBW)

Infants weighing fewer than 2500 g at birth

Very low birth weight (VLBW)

Infants weighing fewer than 1500 g at birth

Extremely low birth weight (ELBW)

Infants weighing fewer than 1000 g at birth

Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR)

Growth of the fetus that is delayed related to gestational age

Small for gestational age (SGA)

Infants whose birthweights are less than expected for their gestational age; <10th percentile is often used

Gestational age

The age of a fetus or newborn, usually stated in weeks from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period

Chronologic age

The age of an infant stated as the amount of time since birth

Corrected age

The age of an infant from birth, minus the number of weeks premature

Appropriate for gestational age (AGA)

Infants whose birthweights are as expected for their gestational age; 10th - 90th percentile is often used

Large for gestational age (LGA)

Infants whose birthweights are greater expected for their gestational age; above the 90th percentile is often used

(Anderson, 1999; Scott, Artman, Hill, 1997)

Feeding problems

Problems with feeding that interfere with an adequate nutrient intake have obvious effects on a child's growth.

Children with neurodevelopmental problems, such as cerebral palsy, often have feeding problems due to structural abnormalities of the oral area (teeth, gums, jaw) or oral-motor dysfunction due to abnormal tone or reflexes affecting their ability to close their lips, suck, swallow or chew (Cloud, 1997; Stevenson, 1995).

Children with neural tube defects such as spina bifida often have the Arnold Chiari malformation of the brain, which makes swallowing difficult (Ekvall, 1993).

Problems with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) can contribute to problems with feeding as well. Many children with neurodevelopmental problems have GER (Cloud, 1997; Stevenson, 1995).

Tactile sensitivity or sensory defensiveness, common among children with cerebral palsy, autism, and spina bifida may cause a child to avoid putting things in his/her mouth (Cloud, 1997; Stevenson, 1995).

Without intervention, these difficulties can lead to inadequate food intake and slowed growth.

Document info
Document views66
Page views66
Page last viewedSat Dec 03 00:24:00 UTC 2016
Pages23
Paragraphs432
Words7169

Comments