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I-2

2000

IDEA

BOOK

5. Using Handout 2 (or a sheet that you have made containing examples of conflict situations), discuss appro- priate and inappropriate responses to conflict situations. Leave part of the appropriate responses blank for the learners to fill in on their own response. Make sure there are sev- eral “You” messages which are incorrect and “I” messages which are correct, so that the learners can compare.

6. Write negative feeling words that show a wide range of emotions such as “scared” or “angry” on the board. These examples can guide the learners in determining the correct words to use in their messages.

  • 7.

    Ask learners to create a list of responses to situations they have experienced or are likely to experi- ence with their children, classmates, or co-workers.

  • 8.

    In the next hour, have learners pair up and practice what they have learned by role-playing the different responses.

LESSON

1

9. As an added emphasis, have learn- ers practice using “I” messages describing how things could be changed. This goes beyond express- ing feelings. For example, if a co-worker tells you that you are doing something wrong, you could reply, “Although I don’t agree, I appreciate your point of view.” Then, for the second part of the “I” statement, you could say, “I wish we could see eye-to-eye more often.”

Assessment The learner will be able to write the correct “I” message conveying both the feeling and the desired change when given a conflict situation from the workplace.

Practitioner Reflection The learners had a much easier time dealing with the parent-child situations than with the workplace situations. I believe this is because they feel more comfortable dealing with problems with which they have had more experience.

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