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Reviews of recent studies from the peer-reviewed literature

NUMBER 8

November 2007

1st

Year

Delaying the development and progression of prostate enlargement should be the goal of every man. In our book “The Prostate and Its Problems” we discuss a number of things one can do to attempt to accomplish this. One is to minimize the so-called modifiable risk factors. In this issue we discuss a recent review that examined what is currently know about these factors and how to minimize their impact. This is followed by a discussion of recent research regarding micronutrients and prostate cancer. Included are the various forms of vitamin E which highlights the importance of the gamma form, and lycopene, which is thought to be the active ingredient of tomatoes, and in particular tomato paste in this context. While there appears to be a shift toward disbelief in the anti- prostate cancer effect of lycopene, the matter is far from simple. A discussion of a commentary by Edward Giovannucci of Harvard hopefully will help clarify the matter.

This issue also includes the results of a meta-analysis (study of studies) that concerns the very important question of early vs. deferred hormonal treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer. This is an important issue for any man with prostate cancer thought to be at this stage since avoiding for as long as possible the adverse effects of the treatment are highly desirable but not advisable if doing this unfavorably impacts the progression of the disease or the mortality.

Wishing you continuing good health, William R. Ware, PhD, Editor

You can order The Prostate and Its Problems at http://www.yourhealthbase.com/prostate/book.htm

MODIFIABLE RISK FACTORS FOR BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA

Most men will encounter symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate) during their lifetime. In the US, recent data indicates that BPH accounts for more than 4.4 million office visits annually and over 100,000 emergency room visits. Its prevalence for men between 60 and 65 is approximately 3 in 4. Obviously, anything that prevents this problem and the associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) or delays progression is highly desirable. Thus a recent study of modifiable risk factors for this problem is of considerable interest.

Parsons performed a comprehensive review of the literature regarding observational studies done on older men [1]. It was found that obesity and diabetes were modifiable factors consistently and significantly associated with

International Health News

November 2007

Page 18

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