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140 F. Sup. 2d 200 (D. Conn.2000). Medical testimony, however, can strengthen such a

claim. Busche v. Burkee, 649 F. 2d 509 (7th Cir. 1981).

The relevant factors to consider in awarding damages for emotional distress include: 1)

whether the discrimination occurred in front of others, 2) the degree of offensiveness of

the discrimination and, 3) the subjective internal emotional reaction of the complainant.

Commission on Human Rights & Opportunities ex rel. Peoples v. Estate of Eva

Belinsky, 1988 WL 492460 (Conn. Super. November 8, 1988). Most of Claywell’s acts

of discrimination and harassment were not witnessed, although Barbara witnessed and

in fact interrupted the September 8, 2004 incident. The most disturbing characteristic of

Claywell’s workplace actions (fully attributable to the respondent entity) is that they

appear to have been designed to intimidate and humiliate. He would uniformly wait until

the complainant was virtually defenseless before engaging in his groping, fondling and

propositioning. The tactics included (previously recounted in part):

pinning

the

complainant

between

his

chair

and

his

desk

rendering

her

virtually

immobile;

  • confronting her while she was seated on the floor and confined to a space measuring perhaps no more than eighteen square feet and throwing books at her while so immobilized;

  • dumping documents in her arms which were already full of documents to be copied and thus defenseless, and

  • surprising and pinning the complainant in a closet as a prelude to an assault.

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