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Part 4: Case Studies

Private Well Testing Act Case Study #1 - Evesham Township, Burlington County

In 2005, a home in Evesham Township, Burlington County had a private well which was tested under the PWTA program. The well was contaminated with tetrachloroethylene, a solvent widely used by the dry cleaning industry. The test result indicated that the well had 4 ppb of tetrachloroethylene. The Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) is 1 ppb.

When a well exceeds a health based MCL, the PWTA authorizes the county health authority to notify neighboring properties within 200 feet of the contaminated well. In this case, the Burlington County Health Department sampled 18 private wells in the

vicinity. Of the 18 wells tested, 12 were concentrations that exceeded the MCL, with

concentration Remediation activities.

of 840 ppb.

Program

in

The County

the

NJDEP

to

Health assist

found to have tetrachloroethylene one well having an extremely high Department then contacted the Site with follow-up testing and remedial

The NJDEP tested an additional 40 private wells in the area. Of those 40 wells, 6 wells exceeded the MCL for tetrachloroethylene, with the highest concentration at 70 ppb. In addition, four of the 40 private wells exceeded the MCL for mercury. All of the wells that exceeded the MCL's for tetrachloroethylene and mercury were eligible in accordance with the NJDEP's Spill Compensation Fund (aka Spill Fund), and had all of the drinking

water remedial treatment costs related contamination covered by the Spill Fund.

to

tetrachloroethylene

and

mercury

Private Well Testing Act Case Study #2 - Byram Township, Sussex County

In the summer of 2004, a well at a house being sold in Byram Township, Sussex County was found to be contaminated with trichloroethylene above the Maximum Contaminant

Level (MCL) of 1 microgram per liter (or part per billion (ppb)). detected was 29 µg/l. The public notification provisions within the suggest that the local health authority notify neighboring properties

The concentration PWTA regulations within at least 200

feet

whenever

a

drinking

water

standard

(e.g.,

MCL)

is

exceeded.

Because

of

the

location of the affected property, so neither the sampling.

property, no homes were located within 200 ft of the affected local health authority nor the State performed any subsequent

Approximately nine months later, a home in the same neighborhood was sold and the well exceeded the MCL for trichloroethylene with a concentration of 39 µg/l. The local health authority notified neighboring properties. Twenty additional wells were tested by neighboring residents. Out of the 20 wells tested, 13 exceeded the MCL for

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