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Interim White Paper - Midwest RPO Candidate Control Measures

3/10/2006 Page 1

Source Category: Gasoline Distribution Facilities

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this document is to provide a forum for public review and comment on the evaluation of candidate control measures that may be considered by the States in the Midwest Regional Planning Organization (MRPO) to develop strategies for ozone, PM2.5, and regional haze State Implementation Plans (SIPs). Additional emission reductions beyond those due to mandatory controls required by the Clean Air Act may be necessary to meet SIP requirements and to demonstrate attainment. This document provides background information on the mandatory control programs and on possible additional control measures.

The candidate control measures identified in this document represent an initial set of possible measures. The MRPO States have not yet determined which measures will be necessary to meet the requirements of the Clean Air Act. As such, the inclusion of a particular measure here should not be interpreted as a commitment or decision by any State to adopt that measure. Other measures will be examined in the near future. Subsequent versions of this document will likely be prepared for evaluation of additional potential control measures.

The evaluation of candidate control measures is presented in a series of “Interim White Papers.” Each paper includes a title, summary table, description of the source category, brief regulatory history, discussion of candidate control measures, expected emission reductions, cost effectiveness and basis, timing for implementation, rule development issues, other issues, and a list of supporting references. Tables 1a, 1b, and 1c summarize this information for gasoline distribution facilities.

SOURCE CATEGORY DESCRIPTION

Gasoline distribution facilities (GDFs) dispense gasoline to motor vehicle fuel tanks from stationary storage vessels. Retail GDFs include traditional service stations, as well as convenience stores, parking garages, and other similar facilities that sell gasoline to the public. Gasoline may also be distributed to vehicles through various non-retail outlets, such as government motor pools and private fleet servicing operations. Gasoline vapors are released to the atmosphere every time a fuel tank is filled with gasoline. This includes filling a large underground storage tank as well as the fuel tank of a motor vehicle. VOC emissions from GDFs are usually classified by three different processes:

  • Stage I loading operations refer to the transfer of gasoline from tank trucks to underground storage tanks (UST). Emissions are generated when gasoline vapors in the UST are displaced to the atmosphere by the gasoline being loaded into the tank.

  • Tank breathing losses occur daily and are attributable to gasoline evaporation and barometric pressure changes.

  • Stage II vehicle refueling operations refer to the transfer of gasoline from the UST to the vehicle’s fuel tank. Emissions are generated when gasoline vapors in the vehicle’s fuel tank are displaced to the atmosphere by the gasoline being loaded into the tank. Included in this category are emissions from spillage from pre-fill and post-fill nozzle drip and from spit-back and overflows from the vehicles' fuel tank filler pipe during filling.

Emissions associated with GDFs were estimated to account for about 6.8 percent of the total anthropogenic VOC emissions in the LADCO region in 2002.

Disclaimer: The control measures identified in this document represent an initial set of possible measures. The Midwest RPO States have not yet determined which measures will be necessary to meet the requirements of the Clean Air Act. As such, the inclusion of a particular measure here should not be interpreted as a commitment or decision by any State to adopt that measure. Other measures will be examined in the near future. Subsequent versions of this document will likely be prepared for evaluation of additional potential control measures.

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