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Brunswick, New Jersey, 1995), 101. 73. Ibid., 102. 74. Ted J. Smith III, ed., In Defense of Tradition: The Collected Shorter Writings of Richard M. Weaver 1929-1963 (Indianapolis, 2000), xxix. Both Smith and Charles Follette (“A Weaverian Interpreta- tion of Richard Weaver,” [Unpublished Disserta- tion, University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, 1981]) note that commentaries on Weaver’s life are often “oddly careless of detail” (Follette, 53) and “inaccuracies of fact and emphasis” (Smith, xiii). Follette says only that Weaver stayed at Vanderbilt University “as a teaching fellow and doctoral student until 1936” (68). 75. Richard M. Weaver, “The Southern Phoenix,” in Southern Writings, 28. 76. “Albert Taylor Bledsoe,” 149. 77. Richard M. Weaver, “Science and Sentimental- ism,” in In Defense of Tradition, 146. 78. Smith, n. 273. 79. Richard M. Weaver, “‘Parson’ Weems: A Study in Early American Rhetoric,” in In Defense of Tradition, 282, 282, 284, and 285. 80. “The Middle Way: A Political Mediation,” in In Defense of Tradition, 545. 81. Ibid., 542. 82. Kirk, 491. 83. Ethics, 3. 84. Visions of Order (Wilmington, Dela- ware, 1995), 9. 85. Ibid. 86. Ethics, 213. 87. Weaver’s treatment of style receives its fullest and most detailed treatment in Charles Follette’s “A Weaverian Interpretation of Richard Weaver” (Unpublished Dissertation, University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, 1981). 88. Ethics, 119. 89. “Language is Sermonic,” in In Defense of Tradition, 359. 90. Ethics, 115. 91. “Language is Sermonic,”

Modern Age

360. 92. Ethics, 27-28. 93. Ibid., 54. 94. Ibid., 17. 95. Ibid., 25. 96. Ibid., 143. 97. Ibid., 144. 98. Ibid. 99. Ibid., 149. 100. Ibid., 144. 101. Ibid., 149-150. 102. Donald C. Bryant, “Rhetoric: Its Functions and Scope,” Quarterly Journal of Speech, 39 (December 1953). 103. Edward P. J. Corbett, Classical Rheto- ric for the Modern Student (New York, 1965), 393. 104. James M. McPherson, Abraham Lincoln and the Second American Revolution (New York, 1991),

    • 97. 105.

      Ethics, 152. 106. Ibid., 155. 107. Ibid., 158.

  • 108.

    Ibid. 109. Ibid. 110. Ibid., 11. 111. Ibid., 12. 112.

Ibid., 11. 113. Ibid., 11-12. 114. Stuart Gerry Brown, Aaron Director, and Richard M. Weaver, “Who Are Today’s Conservatives?” The University of Chicago Round Table, #881 in In Defense of Tradi- tion, 458. 115. Richard M. Weaver, “The Pros- pects of Conservatism,” in In Defense of Tradition, 474. 116. See, for example, Gerry Brown, “Democ- racy, the New Conservatism, and the Liberal Tradition in America,” Ethics 66 (1955); Russell Kirk, “Ethical Labor” and The Conservative Mind, from Burke to Santayana (Chicago, 1953); Willmoore Kendall and George W. Carey, “Towards a Defini- tion of ‘Conservatism,’” The Journal of Politics 26 (1964); and Peter Viereck, Conservatism and Con- servatism Revisited: The Revolt Against Revolt (New York, 1949). 117. Richard M. Weaver, “How to Argue the Conservative Cause,” in In Defense of Tradition, 510. 118. Ibid., 161. 119. Ibid., 22. 120. Ibid., 162-163.

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