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EDUCATION FOR ALL IN THE CARIBBEAN: ASSESSMENT 2000 MONOGRAPH SERIES 24 - page 12 / 44

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followed by a similar presentation of the programmes available in prisons, in order to see if there was consistency and if the EFA guidelines were being followed.

Adult Education

The Hamburg Declaration on Adult Learning adopted at the Fifth International Conference on Adult Education (CONFINTEA V), held in Hamburg, Germany in 1997, described adult education as more than just a right. It states that: “...it is a key to the twenty-first century. It is both a consequence of active citizenship and a condition for full participation in society.” It represents an ongoing learning process, formal or otherwise, whereby people regarded as adults, depending on their society, enrich their knowledge and technical or professional qualifications. It involves both formal, continuing education and non-formal, incidental learning.

The major objectives of adult education programmes may be identified as follows:

General:

  • 1.

    To develop autonomy and the sense of responsibility of people and communities.

  • 2.

    To promote coexistence, tolerance, and the informed and creative participation of citizens in

their communities.

Specific:

  • 1.

    To give late developers a second chance to realise their potential and so remove deficiencies of earlier schooling.

  • 2.

    To enable adults to enhance their qualifications in order to satisfy basic job entry requirements.

  • 3.

    To assist adults who wish to learn a technical skill or craft to do so.

  • 4.

    To provide opportunities for individuals to participate in educational or cultural activity for personal or community development purposes.

The World Declaration on Education for All, in addressing adult education (as will be seen in its six target dimensions), states that it seeks to expand the provisions of basic education in order to assist in the reduction of adult illiteracy rates. Article 1 states: Every person - child, youth and adult - shall be able to benefit from educational opportunities designed to meet their basic learning needs (Final report, 1990, p. 43). The term “basic learning needs,” according to The Hamburg Declaration on Adult Learning, means that people, whatever their ages, have an opportunity, individually and collectively, to realise their potential as a right, a duty, and a response both to others and to society on a whole. More specifically, Article 1 of the World Declaration on Education for All states:

[Basic learning] needs comprise both essential learning tools (such as literacy, oral, expression, numeracy, and problem solving) and the basic learning content (such as knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes) required by human beings to be able to survive, to develop their full capacities, to live and work in dignity, to participate fully in development, to improve the quality of their lives, to make informed decisions and to continue learning. (p. 43)

It is thus obvious that basic learning needs, as stipulated by the EFA programme, are essential for the rehabilitation and re-socialisation of offenders, in the specific context of prison education.

General Overview of EFA in the Caribbean

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