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with some prisons getting less Inspector of Prisons 2004: 37).

  • Prison work

than

20

hours

per

week

purposeful

activity

(HM

Chief

Prison Rules 1999 state that a convicted prisoner shall be required to do useful work for

not

more

than

10

hours

a

day,

and

arrangements

shall

be

made

to

allow

prisoners

to

work, where possible, outside the cells and have to be passed as being medically fit for four main types of work. First, prisoners

in association with one another. the work they are required to do. maintain and service the prison,

Prisoners There are including

cleaning, prisoners

grounds maintenance and working undertake low-skill work for external

in

the

kitchen

and

laundry.

Second,

contractors, such as bagging nails, filling

envelopes

and

assembling

simple

electrical

components.

Women

often

assemble

soft

toys or undertake contracts complex production tasks,

with a either

‘craft’ element. Third, prisoners for external contractors or for

undertake more internal prison

consumption, services such

such as making clothing, furniture as hairdressing for other prisoners

or light engineering. They also provide and, sometimes, members of the public.

Finally, prisoners may work on prison prison consumption. Prisoners are not

farms, producing food entitled to the national

for commercial minimum wage

sale or and are

paid

for

their

work

at

rates

approved

by

the

Secretary

of

State.

In

2002,

the

majority

earned between £5 and £10 per week, depending on the nature may spend at the prison canteen (shop) via a credit system (no

of the work, which cash is handled) or

they they

may save it. Prisoners who

The wish

wage structure is intended to provide an incentive to participate. to work, but cannot, for medical or other reasons, received £2.50 per

week (2002 are allowed

rates). Some prisoners, depending on the stage they are at in their sentence, to work outside establishments. Of the prisoners we interviewed, Muriel had

been allowed to work outside the prison other long term prisoner interviewed.

  • Education

for

a

year

before

her

release

date,

and

so

had

the

Prison prison

Rules 1999 state that every prisoner able to profit from the education facilities at a shall be encouraged to do so. Educational classes shall be arranged at every

prison and reasonable facilities shall be afforded to prisoners who wish improve their education by training by distance learning, private study and

to do so to recreational

classes

in

their

spare

time.

Special

attention

shall

be

paid

to

the

education

and

training

of

prisoners with special educational hours normally allotted to work. prisoner is allowed to have library

needs, and if necessary they shall Every prison is required to have books and to exchange them.

be taught a library

within the and every

In 2001 The Prisoners’ Learning and Skills Unit (PLSU) was created. It is a partnership between the Prison Service and the Department for Education and Skills (DfES). The PLSU is responsible for drawing up a programme of action for the improvement of prison education and training and its links with resettlement. Some of PLSU’s main aims include reviewing the delivery and funding arrangements for education and training in prisons; promoting more effective and consistent educational and skills assessment, induction and individual learning plans; developing the use in prisons of modern technology and working with partners to secure links between education and training inside prison and beyond the gate.

Education in prison is provided under contract by a range of further education colleges, local authority adult education providers and private companies. Vocational training and physical education are managed on a day-to-day basis by the Prison Service through

its 900 instructors.

Education and training provision is monitored by the same education

38

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