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Collection of the Center of Documentation and Investigation of the - page 21 / 36

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It is separated by sections: Jewish women, Institutions, Ana Frank Kindergarten, Cultural Circle, Welfare, Friendship Tea, International Council of Jewish Women, Visits and World Jewish Organizations. There are photographs of farewells, inaugurations, donations, Mexican Red Cross, UNAM scholarships, hospital visits, school lunches, workshops, International meetings, Boards of Directors, etc.  

3) JEWISH CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE FONDS.

It contains the sections Board of Directors, Accounting, National Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Mexico City, Relations with Government and Partners. It has photographs of standing guard at the Angel of Independence, anti-Semitic pamphlets, allegoric carriages and personal cards.

It began its activities on March 24, 1931. Its main goal was to be united to confront the anti-Semitic campaigns, as well as to have a voice to watch over merchants’ interests. It mediated between the associates. It had relations with international Jewish institutions and founded a no interest Loan Society. In 1957 it ceased operating and its functions were integrated into other institutions.

4)

MEXICAN JEWISH CENTRAL COMMITTEE FONDS.

The Mexican Jewish Central Committee began functioning in November 9, 1938 so as to form an organization of the whole Jewish Community in Mexico that would serve as official representative before the country’s authorities. At the beginning, its activities were dedicated to aid European refugees, as well as the task of anti-defamation.

The Tribuna Israelita (Jewish Forum) was founded in 1944 as a branch of the Central Committee.

We have the sections Board of Directors, Jewish Forum, Visits, Intercommunity Relations and Second World War. Among the photographs there are Boards of Directors, Nidjei Israel Library, Conventions of Jewish Communities of Mexico, Visitors (Nahum Goldman, Victor Harel, Aaron Hans), ambulatory kitchens donated during the Second World War and Donations.  

5) COLLECTION OF COMMUNITIES

The Jewish Community in Mexico is divided into several sectors: Ashkenazi Community, Sephardic Community, Monte Sinai and Maguen David.

It contains the Bet-El, Maguen David, Sephardic and Monte Sinai (Sectors of the Jewish Community in Mexico) series.

6) COLLECTION OF CRYPTO JEWS IN MEXICO.

Crypto Jews are those Jews who were forced to convert to Christianity but who continued with their Jewish rites in secret.  

Venta Prieta is located at the entrance of the city of Pachuca, inhabited by descendants of crypto Jews, coming from Zamora, Michoacán. Temixco is also a community of crypto Jews in the State of Morelos.

Sections Venta Prieta and Temixco. Of the latter there is a series of photographs of a native Jewish community, where we can appreciate the cultural fusion by observing the rites and attire.

7) COLLECTION OF COMMUNITIES IN THE PROVINCES.

Jewish immigrants arrived in Monterrey between 1920 and 1930, coming from Eastern Europe. Institutionalization allowed them to keep their Jewish identity. Its characteristic is to be made up of Ashkenazi Jews, with an orthodox religious practice.

The Tijuana community began to gather in the second decade of the 20th century. In the 40s some Holocaust survivors arrived together with Sephardim and Ashkenazim coming from the Federal District, Guadalajara and Monterrey. Some Judaizers, descendants of crypto Jews from the Colonial era, arrived as well.

Sections Monterrey, Jewish Community Center of Monterrey and Tijuana: We find photographs of Nahum Wengrovsky, women’s groups, Polish army, Board of Directors of Keren Kayemet, prayers, Mezuzah collection, excursions, students, etc.  

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