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Gender and Race Differences in Leader Behaviour Preferences in South Africa - page 19 / 35

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White women’s emphasis on independence and individual freedom, employees as workers and planning and future action, were not supported for the variables in this study. Black and White females stayed together through five clusters in Table 2.

Booysen (2001) also found the culture of South African male and female, Black and White managers to focus on different values. However, the cluster analysis in indicates that the leader behaviour preferences of the South African Blacks and Whites of both genders to be the most similar, again remaining in the same cluster through five clusters, and the Black Males remaining with the White Males and Females through six of seven clusters. Studies comparing only those two racial groups could yield misleading interpretations of the actual managerial leader race and gender dynamics in SA.

The small sample of Coloured managers and workers indicated very large differences between Coloured genders and between the other sub-samples. The cluster analysis estimates of dissimilarity between the sub-samples indicate a dramatic consistent difference between Coloured males and all other groups, with universally lower scores. The Coloured females were the next most dissimilar with generally higher scores. The small sample of Coloured managers and workers indicated very large differences between Coloured genders and between the other sub-samples. The cluster analysis estimates of dissimilarity between the sub-samples indicate a dramatic consistent difference between Coloured males and all other groups, with universally lower scores. The Coloured females were the next most dissimilar with generally higher scores.

CONCLUSIONS

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