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Performance of Self-Encoded Spread

Spectrum Under Worst-Case Jamming

Casey Deyle, M.S

University of Nebraska 2009

Advisor: Lim Nguyen

Spread Spectrum Communications uses m-sequences (sometimes referred to as Pseudo

Noise or PN sequences) modulated with a data signal to create a transmission signal that

takes up more bandwidth than the original information signal. Self-Encoded Spread

Spectrum (SESS) uses spreading codes generated by the transmitted signal, eliminating

the need to synchronize m-sequences between the transmitter and receiver, thus making

the channel more secure. This paper will discuss the performance of SESS system in

Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) and Rayleigh fading channels, as well as the

use of an iterative detection to increase the performance of the system. Introduced in this

paper is pulsed noise jammer (PNJ) to a SESS system, which is the worst-case jamming

scenario for a SESS system, and possible ways to overcome these jamming conditions.

The performance of the SESS system in this paper is analyzed using simulations that

measure the probability of error (sometimes called Bit Error Rate or BER) vs signal-to-

noise ratio (also called SNR or Eb/No).

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