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Hourly Rate

No

%

< £4.85

10

17.5

£4.85

10

17.5

Between £4.86 and £5.50

18

31.6

Between £5.51 and £6.69

12

21.1

£6.70 and over

7

12.3

No response = 1

Total

57

100

Table 12: Hourly Rate of Pay for Hotel and Hospitality

year before tax and National Insurance). A similar proportion (£4.85/hour) and a half earned above the NMW but below (£6.70/hour). Only a minority earned above the Living Wage.

earned the NMW the Living Wage

As in the Underground and office cleaning and other services, the largest group earned between £4.86 and £5.50 an hour (the equivalent of between £9,097 and £10,296 a year before tax and National Insurance). However, the proportion of workers in this pay bracket was lower than in the other sectors. The survey results also show that the large majority of those who earned up to the NMW had only taken up their jobs in the previous 12 months, suggesting that new entrants start off at the bottom of the pay scale.

In terms of working conditions, the findings about pay increases were similar to those reported in cleaning on the London Underground. That is, only 22% of workers claimed they had received an annual pay rise, although 16% did not know if they had or not. Two-fifths stated they had never had a pay rise. By contrast, some employment benefits were slighter better in this sector compared to the Underground and office cleaning and other services. This reflects the fact that we interviewed a number of long-serving ‘in house’ workers who had better pay and working conditions than the newer staff and significantly better than those working for agencies. For example, a higher proportion of workers (nearly half) received sick pay (although 12% were unable to tell if they did or not) and fewer (45%) were penalised for taking time off in emergencies. Even so, two thirds of workers did not contribute to a pension scheme, and 63% did not receive maternity or paternity leave, or any kind of other benefits from their employer.

The most common positive feature of the job mentioned by respondents was again simply the opportunity to earn an income (two-fifths). Social contact was singled out by one third of workers, yet 17% could not find anything positive to say about their work.

Workers also revealed the features of their jobs that they did not like (Table 13). In contrast to workers in other sectors, most were concerned about their employer's policies and practices, followed by the nature and demands of the job. A very small minority also singled out the treatment received from customers and the low pay involved.

Although low pay was not often explicitly mentioned, much of the dissatisfaction arising from the employer’s practices was often related to matters of wages. For instance, one respondent claimed that she worked weekends for no extra pay, often

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