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12thought lengthen as they approach the light, until they are lost in light and no night is there!

In Science, sickness is healed upon the same Principle

15and by the same rule that sin is healed. To know the supposed bodily belief of the patient and what has claimed to produce it, enables the practitioner to act more under-

18standingly in destroying this belief. Thus it is in heal- ing the moral sickness; the malicious mental operation must be understood in order to enable one to destroy

21it and its effects. There is not sufficient spiritual power in the human thought to heal the sick or the sinful. Through the divine energies alone one must either get

24out of himself and into God so far that his consciousness is the reflection of the divine, or he must, through argu- ment and the human consciousness of both evil and good,

27overcome evil.

The only difference between the healing of sin and the healing of sickness is, that sin must be uncovered before

30it can be destroyed, and the moral sense be aroused to reject the sense of error; while sickness must be cov- ered with the veil of harmony, and the consciousness be

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1allowed to rejoice in the sense that it has nothing to mourn over, but something to forget.

3Human concepts run in extremes; they are like the action of sickness, which is either an excess of action or not action enough; they are fallible; they are neither

6standards nor models.

If one asks me, Is my concept of you right? I reply, The human concept is always imperfect; relinquish your human

9concept of me, or of any one, and find the divine, and you have gained the right one — and never until then. People give me too much attention of the misguided, fallible sort,

12and this misrepresents one through malice or ignorance.

My brother was a manufacturer; and one day a work- man in his mills, a practical joker, set a man who applied

15for work, in the overseer's absence, to pour a bucket of water every ten minutes on the regulator. When my brother returned and saw it, he said to the jester, "You

18must pay that man." Some people try to tend folks, as if they should steer the regulator of mankind. God makes us pay for tending the action that He adjusts.

21The regulator is governed by the principle that makes the machinery work rightly; and because it is thus gov- erned, the folly of tending it is no mere jest. The divine

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