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Vehicles/Vehicle Parts

Operating the paratransit fleet beyond the useful life reduces the reliability of the service through increased breakdowns, increases exposure to safety risks and increases the cost of expensive maintenance including new engines and transmissions.

32 Capital Needs Inventory

signs, compressors and axle assemblies). A supply of rail replacement components are necessary to switch out items that are beyond economic repair. Metro’s rehabili- tation component needs over the next ten years total $175.8 million.

CNI Project

Total (YOE, $ Millions)

CNI 008: Bus Rehabilitation Components CNI 063: Rail Rehabilitation Components Total

$128.6 $47.2 $175.8

Vehicle Replacement Components includes the following CNI projects:

Purchase of MetroAccess Vehicles ($141.0 Million)

The current MetroAccess fleet consists of over 500 vehicles. After re-evaluation of capacity in terms of service quality and projected ridership, MetroAccess

has adopted a four-year life cycle target for its rolling stock. Operating the paratransit fleet beyond the useful life reduces the reliability of the service t h r o u g h i n c r e a s e d b r e a k d o w n s , i n c r e a s e s e x p o s u r e t o s a f e t y r i s k s a n d i n c r e a s e s

the cost of expensive maintenance including new engines and transmissions. As of April 2009, 51% of the MetroAccess fleet exceeded the retirement age of

4 years. To meet the four-year average fleet age target, Metro plans to purchase a total of 2,631 MetroAccess vehicles from FY 2011 – 2020, for an average of 260 vehicles per year. Each vehicle costs an average of $55,000 bringing the total capital needs from FY 2011 – 2020 to $141.0 million. The number of MetroAccess vehicles that need to be replaced will increase over time as the passenger population expands (projected growth between FY 2011 – 2020 is 112% or 2.3 million).

This replacement project will shift the acquisition strategy for rolling stock from using a paratransit contractor as the purchasing agent to a capitally funded, Metro-owned program. MetroAccess estimates show that shifting to

direct ownership of vehicles will result in significant savings. For example,

in FY 2008, Metro procured 65 MetroAccess replacement vehicles directly

rather than through a contractor, saving $600,000. These savings are real- ized through the tax savings, waived annual license fee (vehicles registered with exempt plates), and elimination of the 11% markup (over $4,500/ve- hicle) that private contractors charge. Combined, savings are approximately $9,200/vehicle when vehicles are purchased directly. In order to continue these savings during future vehicle procurements, Metro must establish a capital funding mechanism for these procurements. The MetroAccess Fleet Management Plan was adopted by the Metro Board and approved by the Federal Transit Administration.

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