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Capital Needs Inventory - page 39 / 100

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Asset Category: Fleet Maintenance Facilities

Metro’s fleet maintenance facilities include nine bus operating garages (a 10th bus division – Southeastern – is being relocated to the DC Village location) and nine rail yards. At these facilities, Metro employees complete regular repairs to the bus and rail fleet, conduct vehicle safety inspections and clean the vehicles for customer comfort. These facilities also provide secure storage of Metro’s bus and rail fleet when these vehicles are not in use. Rehabilitation of Metro’s maintenance facilities is required to upgrade safety, environmental, and maintenance systems, as well as to provide a better work environment for employees. The work at Metro’s maintenance facilities is critical to keeping the Metrobus and Metrorail fleet safe and reliable.

Rail fleet maintenance work includes the following: automatic train controls, brakes, communication devices, doors, lighting, heating and cooling systems, power, propul- sion, signs and signals. Bus maintenance work includes the vehicle power train (engine and transmission), brakes, electrical components, body/doors and heating and cooling system. In addition to regular maintenance, bus facilities are also used to rehabilitate vehicles halfway through their life cycle to extend the useful life of each vehicle. Rail car mid-life rehabilitation is conducted off-site by the rail car manufacturer.

As described in the Metro system overview, Metro’s bus garages range in age from 20 years old to 102 years old, excluding the new West Ox facility that opened in

2009. The average age of Metro’s bus garages (excluding West Ox) is 55.25 yrs. A peer review panel conducted by the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) in 2005 found that due to the age and condition of Metro’s bus garages, working condi-

tions impeded efficient operations. The panel recommended the development of a bus facilities plan to address deficiencies at the garages. As communicated to Metro’s Board in November 2008, Metro aims to place all bus garages on a regular mainte-

nance cycle so that the facilities can continue to serve Metro for many years into the future. These improvements are discussed under Maintenance of Bus Garages.

In June 2009, Metro presented to the Board its strategy for addressing bus garages that have outlived their useful lives. These old facilities present limitations due to the size and configuration of the garage and/or the amount of land area available for bus storage, so more significant investments are needed. These investments are addressed under Rehabilitation and Replacement of Bus Garages.

Rehabilitation of Metro’s main- tenance facilities is required to upgrade safety, environmental, and maintenance systems, as well as to provide a better work environ- ment for employees. The work at Metro’s maintenance facilities is critical to keeping the Metrobus and Metrorail fleet safe and reliable.

Metro’s first rail yards were constructed at the opening of the Metrorail system in 1976. The youngest yard, Largo, was put into service in 2004. The Maintenance of Rail Yards program allows Metro to extend the useful lives of these facilities. Main- tenance includes replacing equipment and building systems that have reached the end of their life cycles and repairs to worn walls, ceilings and floors. The first series of rail yard improvements was presented to the Metro Board in September 2009.

Testing and commissioning of new and rehabilitated rail cars is done on Metrorail track during the short 4-hour window when the rail system is closed. With the influx of over

Investment Category: Performance 37

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