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(n105) See LIKIERMAN REPORT, supra note 99, at 23-25. The degree of proximity between auditor and third party necessary to establish liability for negligent misstatement is a question that has been developing in British courts since 1951, and, as in the United States, does not yet appear to have come to rest. A holding from a 1981 case resembled the reasonable foreseeability rule of H. Rosenblum v. Adler, and "[t]his expansion in the range of third parties to whom duties are owed was a cause of considerable concern to accountants," but "there has been a narrowing in the scope of tortious liability for economic loss in the past few years." Id. at 24.

(n106) Nathan Kranowski, Auditing Standards in France, in COMPARATIVE INTERNATIONAL AUDITING STANDARDS 37 (Belverd E. Needles Jr. ed. 1985) [hereinafter Kranowski].

(n107) JEFFREY S. ARPAN & LEE H. RADEBAUGH, INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING AND MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES 30 (1981).

(n108) Kranowski, supra note 106, at 37.

(n109) Id. at 38; LESLIE G. CAMPBELL, INTERNATIONAL AUDITING 59 (1985).

(n110) Kranowski, supra note 106, at 37.

(n111) Id.

(n112) Id. at 41.

(n113) Id. at 38.

(n114) Id. at 40.

(n115) CAMPBELL, supra note 109, at 60.

(n116) Kranowski, supra note 106, at 40.

(n117) Id.

(n118) Id. at 41.

(n119) CAMPBELL, supra note 108, at 60.

(n120) Dingell Comm. Hearings, supra note 77, Part 6 at 18-19.

(n121) See supra note 82.

(n22) Tadakazu Nakase, Auditing Standards in Japan, in COMPARATIVE INTERNATIONAL AUDITING STANDARDS 106 (Belverd E. Needles Jr. 1985) [hereinafter Nakase].

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