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Chapter 4—Striped Bass, Neotropical Migrants, Wild Turkey

This chapter highlights species that are points of focus during the summer months.  The following accounts and information on the black bear, loggerhead sea turtle, and largemouth bass will explain why these species are important wildlife resources and what is being done to responsibly manage these species.  You can go directly to any of these sections by clicking on their name:  Striped Bass, Neotropical Migrants, Wild Turkey.

NEOTROPICAL MIGRATORY BIRDS

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:  

Birds are among the most easily observed wildlife species in Georgia.  Unlike many of their mammalian counterparts, the vast majority of birds are diurnal, and are often fairly tolerant of human presence and observation.  Of the 407 bird species that have occurred in Georgia, about 90 are neotropical migrants, which means they breed in the United States and Canada but winter in Mexico, the Caribbean, or Central and South America.  

Tropic of Capricorn
Tropic of Cancer

Not only are many of these birds brightly colored and spectacular birds to observe, their feats of prolonged endurance and navigation during migration are truly staggering.  Imagine the Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris), weighing less than a penny, flying non-stop over the Gulf of Mexico, a continuous 24-hour flight of about 500 miles.  

        Wintering ground for our neotropical migrants.

WHO ARE OUR NEOTROPICAL MIGRANTS?

Most of our neotropical migrants are songbirds, a diverse group distinguished from other birds by a unique split voice-box that produces their often beautiful and complex songs. They range from the dazzlingly colored wood warblers and orioles, to the earth-tone thrushes and flycatchers.  Neotropical migrant songbirds include the flycatchers (Tyrannidae), vireos (Vireonidae), thrushes (Turdidae), swallows (Hirundinidae), wood warblers (Parulidae), tanagers (Thraupidae), and orioles (Icteridae).  Other families of birds migrate as well, and neotropical migrants are found among waterfowl (Anatidae), shorebirds (Charadriidae & Scolopacidae), vultures (Cathartidae), raptors (Accipitridae & Falconidaecuckoos (Cuculidae), swifts (

Painted Bunting Image from Thayer Birding Software

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