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PKI Teaching Guide

Page 6 of 36

see the world? How might the media and various social and environmental influences affect artistic expression? What environmental and social influences may have affected Kane’s sketches?

4.

Have students think about their cultural backgrounds – their relatives, where their

families originated, their spiritual beliefs, family traditions, and so on. Have them create a personal profile about themselves combining their cultural backgrounds with their personal interests. Ask students to create collages from found photographs and images to tell these

stories visually, and present the work to the class.

5.

Have the students find in the community, on the internet, or at home, examples of

items in the media that have been specifically influenced by a particular culture.

2b. - Video - Roots of Romanticism

This video provides an in depth discussion about Romanticism and in particular the myth of the “noble savage” and how it was popularized historically.

Concepts:

  • the myth of the “noble savage”

  • Romanticism

  • Enlightenment thinking

  • multiple perspectives

  • stereotyping

  • cultural identity.

Learning Objectives:

  • use analytical and critical thought to respond to Kane’s art works and infer meanings

based on the context of his times

  • understand how historical, social and environmental factors and issues influence visual

art and artists

  • analyze how trends in fashion, décor, architecture etc. relate to social, political and

environmental contexts

  • examine various styles of art, both historical and contemporary, in a variety of art forms

  • analyze materials in the media for bias and stereotypes and replace these with

accurate information

  • investigate how artists’, art historians’, and critics’ views about art vary and why this

might be so.

2b. Roots of Romanticism - Video Script(R/T 1:36)

Romanticized images of Indigenous people from the mid-19th century are still part of the poplar imagination today. Many of Paul Kane’s oil on canvas paintings contribute to this legacy because he painted his subjects to

From Field to Studio: The art of Paul Kane

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