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the same cold rules of logic and evidence. The benighted are to be made “aware,” to have their “consciousness raised,” and the wistful hope is held out that they will “grow.” Should the benighted prove recalcitrant, however, then their “mean-spiritedness” must be fought and the “real reasons” behind their arguments and actions exposed. (pp. 2–3)

If individuals with learning disabilities are to receive the very best education possible and be accepted by a caring and loving community, educators must join to stop yet another “education war” that truly deters special education from being the helping profession it was created to be.

REFERENCES

Abt Associates. (1976). Education as experimentation: A planned variation model, Vol. 3A. Cambridge, MA: Author.

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Adams, M. J. (1990). Beginning to read: Thinking and learning about print. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Andrews, J. E., Carnine, D. W., Coutinho, M. J., Edgar, E. B., Forness, S. R., Fuchs, L. S., et al. (2000). Bridging the special education divide. Remedial and Special Education, 21, 258–260, 267.

Anderson, P. L., & Meier-Hedde, R. (2001). Early case reports of dyslexia in the United States and Europe. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 34, 9–21.

Anonymous. (1966). Minimal brain dysfunction in children: Terminology and identification. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Association for Children with Learning Disabilities. (1986). ACLD definition: Specific learning disabilities. ACLD Newsbriefs, 15–16.

Barsch, R. H. (1967). Achieving perceptual-motor efficiency: A space-oriented approach to learning. Seattle, WA: Special Child Publications.

Bateman, B. (1965). An educational view of a diagnostic approach to learning disorders. In J. Hellmuth (Ed.), Learning disorders: Vol. 1 (pp. 219–239). Seattle, WA: Special Child Publications.

Beichtman, J. H., Hood, J., & Inglis, A. (1992). Familial transmission of speech and language impairment: A preliminary investigation. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 37(3), 151–156.

Broadbent, W. H. (1872). On the cerebral mechanism of speech and thought. Proceedings of the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society of London (pp. 25-29). London: Anonymous.

Brown, G. S., & Campbell, D. P. (1948). Principles of servomechanisms. New York: John Wiley.

Bryan, T., Pearl, R., Donahue, M., Bryan, J., & Pflaum, S. (1983). The Chicago Institute for the Study of Learning Disabilities. Exceptional Education Quarterly, 4(1), 1–22.

Bryant, N. D. Recommendations for programmatic research. (1972). Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Education.

Bryant, N. D., Kass, C. E., & Wiederholt, J. L. (1972). Final Report: Leadership Training Institute in Learning Disabilities. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Education.

Bush, W. J., & Giles, M. T. (1969). Aids to psycholinguistic teaching. Columbus, OH: Merrill.

Clements, S. D. (1966). Minimal brain dysfunction in children: Terminology and identification: Phase one of a three-phase project. NINDS Monographs, 9, Public Health Service Bulletin No. 1415. Washington: DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Cohen, S. A. (1969). Studies in visual perception and reading in disadvantaged children. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 2, 498–507.

Cohen, S. A. (1970). Cause versus treatment in reading achievement. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 3, 163–166.

Connor, F. P. (1983). Improving school instruction for learning disabled children: The Teachers

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