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Appendices

I

II

III

ORCHIDACEAE spp.8 #8 (Except the species included in Appendix I)

(For all of the following AppendixI species, seedling or tissue cultures obtained in vitro, in solid or liquid media, transported in sterile containers are not subject to the provisions of the Convention)

Aerangis ellisii

Dendrobium cruentum

Laelia jongheana

Laelia lobata

Paphiopedilum spp.

Peristeria elata

Phragmipedium spp.

Renanthera imschootiana

OROBANCHACEAE Broomrape

Cistanche deserticola #1

PALMAE (Arecaceae) Palms

Beccariophoenix madagascariensis

Chrysalidocarpus decipiens

Lemurophoenix halleuxii

Marojejya darianii

Neodypsis decaryi #1

Ravenea louvelii

Ravenea rivularis

Satranala decussilvae

Voanioala gerardii

PAPAVERACEAE Poppy

Meconopsis regia #1 (Nepal)

PINACEAE Guatemala fir

Abies guatemalensis

PODOCARPACEAE Podocarps

Podocarpus neriifolius #1 (Nepal)

8Artificially propagated specimens of hybrids of the genera Cymbidium, Dendrobium, Phalaenopsis and Vanda are not subject to the provisions of the Convention when:

1)the specimens are traded in shipments consisting of individual containers (i.e. cartons, boxes or crates) each containing 20 or more plants of the same hybrid;

2)the plants within each container can be readily recognized as artificially propagated specimens by exhibiting a high degree of uniformity and healthiness; and

3)the shipments are accompanied by documentation, such as an invoice, which clearly states the number of plants of each hybrid.

Artificially propagated specimens of the following hybrids:

Cymbidium: Interspecific hybrids within the genus and intergeneric hybrids

Dendrobium: Interspecific hybrids within the genus known in horticulture as "nobile-types" and "phalaenopsis-types"

Phalaenopsis: Interspecific hybrids within the genus and intergeneric hybrids

Vanda: Interspecific hybrids within the genus and intergeneric hybrids

are not subject to the provisions of the Convention when:

1)they are traded in flowering state, i.e. with at least one open flower per specimen, with reflexed petals;

2)they are professionally processed for commercial retail sale, e.g. labelled with printed labels and packaged with printed packages;

3)they can be readily recognized as artificially propagated specimens by exhibiting a high degree of cleanliness, undamaged inflorescences, intact root systems and a general absence of damage or injury that could be attributable to plants originating in the wild;

4)the plants do not exhibit characteristics of wild origin, such as damage by insects or other animals, fungi or algae adhering to leaves, or mechanical damage to inflorescences, roots, leaves or other parts resulting from collection; and

5)the labels or packages indicate the trade name of the specimen, the country of artificial propagation or, in the case of international trade during the production process, the country where the specimen was labelled and packaged; and the labels or packages show a photograph of the flower, or demonstrate by other means the appropriate use of labels and packages in an easily verifiable way.

Plants not clearly qualifying for the exemption must be accompanied by appropriate CITES documents.

Appendices I, II & III (12/01/2005) – p. 38

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