X hits on this document

PDF document

This document is part of the World Air Ops online Library - page 112 / 145

356 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

112 / 145

Guidance concerning Air Navigation in and above the NAT MNPSA

CHAPTER 16

route requirements in all regions. Failure to comply may result in rejected flight plans, lengthy delays and operating penalties such as in-flight re-routes and/or the flight not receiving requested altitudes.

  • -

    If (and only if) the flight is planned to operate along the entire length of one of the organized tracks, from oceanic entry point to oceanic exit point, as detailed in the NAT track message, should the intended track be defined in Item 15 of the ICAO flight plan using the abbreviation "NAT" followed by the code letter assigned to the track.

  • -

    The planned Mach number and flight level at the commencement point of the track should be specified at the organised track commencement point.

  • -

    Each point at which a change of Mach Number or flight level is requested must be specified as geographical co-ordinates in latitude and longitude or as a named point.

  • -

    For flights operating along the entire length of an OTS track, estimated elapsed times (EET/ in Item 18) are only required for the commencement point of the track and for FIR boundaries.

Planning a Random Route

16.6.7

A Random route is any route that is not planned to operate along the entire length of the

organised track from oceanic entry point to oceanic exit point.

      • 16.6.8

        A Random route is described as follows : -

        • -

          For generally East/West flights south of 70N, by significant points formed by the intersection of half or whole degrees of latitude with meridians spaced at intervals of 10 degrees from Greenwich meridian to longitude 70 degrees West.

  • -

    For generally East/West flights north on 70N, by significant points formed by the intersection of parallels of latitude expressed in degrees and minutes with meridians spaced at intervals of 20 degrees from the Greenwich meridian to longitude 60 degrees West.

  • -

    For generally North/South flights, formed by the intersection of half or whole degrees of longitude with specified parallels of latitude which are separated at 5 degrees interval from 20 degrees North to 90 degrees North.

16.6.9

Random routes can be planned anywhere within MNPS Airspace but the dispatcher should

sensibly avoid those routes that conflict directly with the OTS. Examples of sensibly planned random routes

include routes that:

    • -

      Remain clear of the OTS by at least 1 deg;

    • -

      Leave or join outer tracks of the OTS;

    • -

      Are above or below the OTS flight level stratum;

    • -

      Are planned on track co-ordinates before/after valid OTS times.

      • 16.6.10

        Care should be taken when planning random routes and it would be prudent to plan

sufficient fuel to allow for potential re-routes or non-optimum altitudes. The following examples illustrate particular issues to consider.

Examples:

  • -

    Flights planned to initially operate below MNPS Airspace/RVSM flight levels at FL280 on routes that pass under the OTS should not plan to climb until 1 degree clear of the OTS.

  • -

    Planning to join an outer track is allowable. However, the dispatcher should be aware that the clearance may not be given due to the adverse impact on track capacity. Leaving an outer track

NAT Doc 007

96

Edition 2010

Document info
Document views356
Page views356
Page last viewedMon Dec 05 17:23:37 UTC 2016
Pages145
Paragraphs4885
Words62134

Comments