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Guidance concerning Air Navigation in and above the NAT MNPSA

CHAPTER 2

CHAPTER 2:

THE ORGANISED TRACK SYSTEM (OTS)

    • 2.1

      GENERAL

      • 2.1.1

        As a result of passenger demand, time zone differences and airport noise restrictions, much

of the North Atlantic (NAT) air traffic contributes to two major alternating flows: a westbound flow departing Europe in the morning, and an eastbound flow departing North America in the evening. The effect of these flows is to concentrate most of the traffic unidirectionally, with peak westbound traffic crossing the 30W longitude between 1130 UTC and 1900 UTC and peak eastbound traffic crossing the 30W longitude between 0100 UTC and 0800 UTC.

2.1.2

Due to the constraints of large horizontal separation criteria and a limited economical height

band (FL310–400) the airspace is congested at peak hours. In order to provide the best service to the bulk of the traffic, a system of organised tracks is constructed to accommodate as many flights as possible within the major flows on or close to their minimum time tracks and altitude profiles. Due to the energetic nature of the NAT weather patterns, including the presence of jet streams, consecutive eastbound and westbound minimum time tracks are seldom identical. The creation of a different organised track system is therefore necessary for each of the major flows. Separate organised track structures are published each day for eastbound and westbound flows. These track structures are refered to as the Organised Track System or

OTS.

2.1.3

It should be appreciated, however, that use of OTS tracks is not mandatory. Currently about

half of NAT flights utilise the OTS. Aircraft may fly on random routes which remain clear of the OTS or may fly on any route that joins or leaves an outer track of the OTS. There is also nothing to prevent an operator from planning a route which crosses the OTS. However, in this case, operators must be aware that whilst ATC will make every effort to clear random traffic across the OTS at published levels, re-routes or significant changes in flight level from those planned are very likely to be necessary during most of the OTS

traffic periods.

2.1.4

Over the high seas, the NAT Region is primarily Class A airspace (at and above FL55) (See

ICAO Doc. 7030 - NAT Regional Supplementary Procedures), in which Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) apply at all times. Throughout the NAT Region, below FL410, 1000 feet vertical separation is applied. However, airspace utilisation is under continual review, and within the MNPS portion of NAT airspace, in addition to the strategic and tactical use of ‘opposite direction’ flight levels during peak flow periods the Mach Number

Technique is applied.

2.2

CONSTRUCTION OF THE ORGANISED TRACK SYSTEM (OTS)

General processes

2.2.1

The appropriate OAC constructs the OTS after determination of basic minimum time tracks;

with due consideration of airlines' preferred routes and taking into account airspace restrictions such as danger areas and military airspace reservations. The night-time OTS is produced by Gander OAC and the day-time OTS by Shanwick OAC (Prestwick), each incorporating any requirement for tracks within the New York, Reykjavik, Bodø and Santa Maria Oceanic Control Areas (OCAs). OAC planners co-ordinate with adjacent OACs and domestic ATC agencies to ensure that the proposed system is viable. They also take into account the requirements of opposite direction traffic and ensure that sufficient track/flight level profiles are

NAT Doc 007

9

Edition 2010

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