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Erowid Cannabis Vault : Legal Status, U.S. LAW | Both Cannabis and Tetrahydrocannabinols, the active chemicals contained in Cannabis plants, are Schedule I in the United States. This means they are federally illegal to cultivate, buy, possess, or distribute (sell, trade or give) in all forms (cannabis plants, extracts, hash, hash oil, thc, etc) except synthetic THC (Marinol) which is Schedule III. The federal scheduling of Cannabis was disputed in 1988 by Judge Francis Young, an administrative law judge for the DEA, who recommended that marijuana be reclassified as schedule II on the grounds that if a respectable minority of doctors endorse it, then it has a

"currently

accepted

medical

use".

Visit:

http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannabis/cannabis law.shtml

Legal and medical status of cannabis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Cannabis is in Schedule IV of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, making it subject to special restrictions. Article 2 provides for the following, in reference to Schedule IV drugs:

A Party shall, if in its opinion the prevailing conditions in its country render it the most appropriate means of protecting the public health and welfare, prohibit the production, manufacture, export and import of, trade in, possession or use of any such drug except for amounts which may be necessary for medical and scientific research only, including clinical trials therewith to be conducted under or subject to the direct supervision and control of the Party.

This provision, while apparently providing for the limitation of cannabis to research purposes only, also seems to allow some latitude for nations to make their own judgments. The official Commentary on the Single Convention indicates that Parties are expected to make that judgment in good faith. Click > here < for more.

LEGISLATION, Action Items and related Resources

Drug Policy Alliance: Reform in North Carolina | State legislatures are traditionally at the forefront of policy change, serving as "laboratories" for new ideas and solutions. Drug policy reform is no exception: on issues of drug sentencing, medical marijuana, overdose prevention, and expansion of effective drug treatment services, many states are working for better ways to reduce the harms associated both with drugs and current drug policies. ... visit: http://www.drugpolicy.org/statebystate/

NORML / A Page Just For You / Medical Marijuana Patients | This section is to help you locate the information you need to become fully informed regarding medical marijuana -- as well as play an important role in changing America’s misguided marijuana laws. Select One, All States and Canada, Mexico, Europe, Other ... visit: http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group ID=4482

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