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is not required to be included in income prior to the maturity or disposition of a short-term note. Thus, if a short- term note provides for a single interest payment at maturity, you will be required to include that payment as ordinary income upon maturity of the note. In addition, you will be required to treat any gain realized on a sale, exchange or retirement of a short-term note as ordinary income to the extent such gain does not exceed the interest accrued during the period you held the note. The treatment of interest payments received on a short-term note prior to maturity is not entirely clear under these special rules, however, and it is possible that you would be required to include such payments as ordinary income at the time received rather than upon a subsequent disposition of the note.

You may not be allowed to deduct all of the interest paid or accrued on any indebtedness incurred or maintained to purchase or carry a short-term note until the note matures or upon an earlier disposition in a taxable transaction. However, you may elect to accrue interest in gross income on a current basis and avoid the limitation on the deductibility of interest described above.

Non-U.S. Holders

If you are a non-resident alien individual or a foreign corporation (a “non-U.S. holder”), the interest income that you derive in respect of the notes generally will be exempt from United States federal withholding tax. This exemption will apply to you provided that

  • you do not actually or constructively own 10 percent or more of the combined voting power of all classes of our stock and you are not a controlled foreign corporation that is related, directly or indirectly to us through stock ownership, and

  • the beneficial owner provides a statement (generally, an Internal Revenue Service Form W-8BEN) signed under penalties of perjury that includes its name and address and certifies that it is a non-U.S. person in compliance with applicable requirements (or satisfies certain documentary evidence requirements for establishing that it is a non-U.S. person).

If you are a non-U.S. holder, any gain you realize on a sale, exchange or other disposition of notes generally will be exempt from United States federal income tax, including withholding tax. This exemption will not apply to you if your gain is effectively connected with your conduct of a trade or business in the United States or you are an individual holder and are present in the United States for 183 days or more in the taxable year of the disposition and either your gain is attributable to an office or other fixed place of business that you maintain in the United States or you have a tax home in the United States.

U.S. federal estate tax will not apply to a note held by you if at the time of death you were not a citizen or resident of the United States, you did not actually or constructively own 10 percent or more of the combined voting power of all classes of our stock and payments of interest on the note would not have been effectively connected with the conduct by you of a trade or business in the United States.

For purposes of applying the rules set forth under this heading “Non-U.S. Holders” to a note held by an entity that is treated as fiscally transparent (for example, a partnership) for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the beneficial owner means each of the ultimate beneficial owners of the entity.

Information Reporting and Backup Withholding

The paying agent must file information returns with the Internal Revenue Service in connection with payments made on the notes to certain U.S. holders. If you are a U.S. holder, you generally will not be subject to United States backup withholding tax on such payments if you provide your taxpayer identification number to the paying agent. You may also be subject to information reporting and backup withholding tax requirements with

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