X hits on this document

PDF document

United Nations Reform: U.S. Policy and - page 17 / 38

65 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

17 / 38

CRS-14

to advocate its reform agenda, though it does not support mandatory withholding of U.S. payments to the United Nations.54 It has identified several key priorities that it believes will help the United Nations “move towards a goal of strong, effective, and accountable organization.” 55

Management, Budget and Secretariat Reform

The Administration views management, budget, and secretariat reform as a top U.S. priority for U.N. reform. It contends that substantive change in the United Nation’s management and budget structure, particularly within the Secretariat, may contribute to the implementation of more effective U.N. policies and further reforms.56 In a statement before the General Assembly in 2005, President Bush said that meaningful reforms “include measures to improve internal oversight, identify cost savings, and ensure that precious resources are used for their intended purpose.”57 President Bush also emphasized the creation of U.N. structures to “ensure financial accountability and administration and organizational efficiency.” Specifically, the Administration advocates: 58

!

Increased Oversight and Accountability in U.N. Management Structures — This includes enhanced oversight of procurement activities and management in the Secretariat, including the Department of Peacekeeping Operations, as well as a fully independent Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS).59 The Administration also advocates increasing the authority of the Secretary-General to hire and deploy personnel.

53 (...continued) with “his diagnosis of the problem and supports his efforts.” Testimony by then-U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Challenges and Opportunities in Pushing Ahead on U.N. Reform, May 25, 2006. Available at [http://www.state.gov/p/io/rls/rm/66904.htm].

54 Testimony by then-U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Challenges and Opportunities in Moving Ahead on U.N. Reform, October 18, 2005, available at [http://www.state.gov/p/io/rls/rm/55341.htm].

55 Drawn from U.S. Department of State Fact Sheet, “U.S. Priorities for a Stronger, More Effective United Nations,” June 17, 2005, available at [http://www.state.gov/documents/ organization/53104.pdf].

56 Testimony by then-U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, May 25, 2006.

57 “President Addresses United Nations High-Level Plenary Meeting,” Office of the Press Secretary, The White House, September 14, 2005.

58 The National Security Strategy of the United States of America, Executive Office of the President, March 2006, p. 45.

59 OIOS is dependent on much of its funding from the U.N. programs that it audits, which some believe creates a conflict of interest. For more information, see U.S. Government Accountability Office Report GAO-05-392T, United Nations: Sustained Oversight is Needed for Reforms to Achieve Lasting Results, March 2, 2006, and GAO Report 08-84, United Nations Progress on Management Reform Efforts has Varied, November 2007.

Document info
Document views65
Page views65
Page last viewedFri Dec 02 20:18:42 UTC 2016
Pages38
Paragraphs630
Words16138

Comments