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Asthma Health Outcomes Project

Overviews of Surveyed Asthma ProgramsSeptember 2005

Domestic Programs: California (cont'd) Back to Index

Effects of individual self-management education on clinical, biological, and adherence outcomes in asthma

University of California San Francisco

San Francisco, CA

Susan L. Janson, DNSc, RN, ANP, FAAN

(415) 476-5282         

Susan.janson@nursing.ucsf.edu

In a prospective, randomized controlled trial of 65 adults with mild-to-moderate asthma, researchers from the University of California San Francisco examined whether an educational self-management intervention would improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroid therapy, decrease markers of airway inflammation, and improve clinical control. Peak flow, symptoms, and adherence were monitored for 7 weeks.  After a 1-week run-on, subjects were assigned randomly to either the educational intervention or control group. The 30-minute intervention was delivered and reinforced at biweekly intervals.

Compared with the control group, the intervention group had improvements in adherence to inhaled corticosteroid therapy (by 30% vs. -5%, P=0.01), self-reported control of asthma (by 14% vs. 5%, P=0.04), and perhaps quality of life (by 37% vs. 21%, P=0.06). The direction of change for all other clinical outcomes was more favorable in the intervention group, but not significantly so. Markers of inflammation in sputum decreased more in the intervention group, with sputum eosinophils declining significantly (P=0.02).

In asthmatic patients treated with inhaled corticosteroids, education and training in self-management improves adherence with inhaled therapy, perceived control of asthma, and sputum eosinophilia.

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