X hits on this document

PDF document

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA - page 32 / 153

309 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

32 / 153

threats. The ‘expanded use’ of roadside bombs, rocket propelled grenades, and small arms fire in Al Anbar province requires a more robust family of vehicles” (Sherman & Castelli, 2007). His request went unfilled for four months, and the issue surfaced again in a June 10, 2005, status report indicating that the Marine Corps was holding out for a “future vehicle,” presumably the JLTV—more mobile than the MRAP, but more protective than the HMMWV. This vehicle was not expected to be available, however, until 2012 (Eisler, Moorison, & Vanden Brook, 2007).

In May and July 2006, the Multi-National Forces West (MNF-W) Commander in Iraq submitted urgent universal need statement (UUNS) requests for 185 and then an additional 1,000 vehicles. Those requests were combined and designated as a Joint Urgent Operational Needs Statement (JUONS) by the Central Command (CENTCOM)

commander in October 2006. MARCORSYSCOM released the

After the JROC validated that initial RFP on November 9, and the

initial MRAP

request, JPO was

established within MARCORSYSCOM the early uncertainty in the program,

shortly thereafter the initial 1,185

on December 6. To illustrate requirement grew to 15,374

vehicles

by

September

2007

(Mann,

2008,

slide

3).

By

March

2007,

the

Marine

Corps

Commandant, James requirement” (Eisler, Defense, Mr. Robert

Conway, called the vehicle his “Number 1 unfulfilled warfighting Moorison, & Vanden Brook, 2007). In May 2007, the Secretary of Gates, made MRAP the top DoD acquisition priority. In addition,

Secretary

Gates

assigned

the

program

a

DX

rating

(priority

rating

reserved

for

the

top

acquisition programs) in June 2007, and by September designated an ACAT 1D Program, placing oversight in Secretary of Defense (OSD) (Miles, 2007).

of that year,

the

the hands of

the

program was Office of the

4. Manufacturers

The source selection process resulted in the procurement of MRAP vehicles from five different manufacturers: BAE Systems (BAE); Armor Holdings (AH) (now owned by BAE Systems); General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS); Force Protection Industries, Inc. (FPII); and Navistar’s International Military and Government, LLC subsidiary (IMG) (now called Navistar Defense). Although limited commonality exists

10

Document info
Document views309
Page views309
Page last viewedSat Dec 03 06:58:07 UTC 2016
Pages153
Paragraphs3344
Words40255

Comments