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CRC/C/BGD/4

page 74

Table 7.1

Growth of primary schools, students and teachers

Year

Number of schools

Number of students

Number of teachers

Student/ teacher ratio

Govt.

Non-govt

Total

   % Increase

Total

   % Increase

 % Girls

Total

  % Female

1995

37 710

25 310

63 020

-

17 133 186

-

47.1

258 884

24.2

66.18

2000

37 677

40 455

78 126

8.5

17 659 220

3.1

48.9

320 694

33.8

55.07

2005

37 672

42 725

80 397

2.9

16 225 658

(8.10)

50.1

344 789

36.3

47.00

Source: BANBEIS.

313.The Net Enrolment Rate (NER) is also on increase. The NER of children at primary level has increased from 82.7 percent in 2003 to 87.2 percent in 2005.

314.The drop out rate has gone down from 35 percent in 2000 to 33 percent in 2002, further dropped to 32 percent in 2004, indicating that still a large number of students cannot complete the primary education. BBS reports suggest that in 2004, the drop out rate varied between 34 percent of boys against 31 of girls, with slight variation between urban (31 percent) and rural (34 percent). In primary level, repetition rate is 10.5% and attendance rate stands at 77 percent (MoPME).

315.Studies carried out by Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies (BIDS) on primary education provide several important conclusions. These show that access to primary education is found to be highly correlated with family resources and parental education while progression and performance in primary education is significantly correlated with institutional factors i.e. quality of teachers, contact hour, physical infrastructure and school management. It has not been possible to bring all children to school in neither the formal system nor the non-formal stream. Available statistics on exclusion indicate that children never enrolled and children enrolled but dropped out account for nearly one-fifth of the primary school age group.

316.The causes of exclusion are social, economic, physical as well as environmental. Nonenrolment varies between the regions of the country. The statistics indicate that a significant percentage of boys and girls from below-poverty level families which account for about 40 percent, remain excluded from primary education. Although primary education is officially free and universal, there are other direct costs i.e., admission fee, examination fee, day observation fee, peon fee, utility fees etc. Besides, there are incidental costs, e.g. transport, dress etc.

317.The Government is committed to achieve total enrolment by 2015 with maintaining quality. The Government under the multi year and multi component PEDP-II has adopted a programme approach to address the concerns of primary education with many-fold focus: increasing number of teachers, class room and infrastructure; improving class room environment; enhancing training and other incentives for teacher as well as systemizing teacher recruit procedure and strengthening management practices in the schools.

Table 7.2

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