X hits on this document

124 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

19 / 52

industry has encountered from large increases in shrimp imports and high fuel costs, effort may already be reduced by over one third.  This statement is based on the fact that there are currently approximately 2,500 valid shrimp vessel permits as compared with previous estimates using the SLF and VOUF of nearly 4,000.  Although a reduction in the number of permits does not directly relate to a decrease in effort, anecdotal information indicates that a large number of vessels are not operating due to high fuel costs and low shrimp prices that make shrimping unprofitable.  If this information is correct, additional bycatch reduction may have already

occurred.  Furthermore, the impacts of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the number of vessels that will likely be fishing in the near future is unknown could be significant, especially in the short-term.

Action to establish a trip-based IFQ system or a landings-based system (Option a) would reduce effort and bycatch through a reduction in trips or days fished, as data are currently collected by NMFS.  Each vessel permit holder would be allocated a certain number of days/trips to fish within a season or landings.  As with area or seasonal closures, some type of VMS or electronic logbook would likely be needed in order to enforce this alternative.  Another difficulty in implementing this alternative would be determining the number of days/trips that would be optimum with regard to shrimp harvest and bycatch reduction.  Also, there would be a problem with how individual vessels’ initial and future qualification and allocations are determined.  This would entail decisions on whether all vessels would get the same number of days to fish or if it would be prorated based on previous historical participation, vessel size, or other criteria.  Obviously vessel length and numbers of nets would be factors to consider when evaluating operational costs and shares (days) if a prorated IFQ system is used.  On the other hand, limiting the length of trips could reduce efficiency and increase costs, possibly to the point that large boats that have high operating costs and make extended trips could not continue operations.

Action 3.  Alternatives to improve enforcement through the requirement of VMS

Alternative 1.  No action - do not require VMS systems aboard shrimp trawl vessels fishing in or transiting any portion of the EEZ of the Gulf of Mexico

Alternative 2.  Require a properly functioning NMFS certified VMS aboard all shrimp trawl vessels fishing in or transiting the EEZ of the Gulf of Mexico off the West Coast of Florida South of 29N. Latitude (Yankeetown, Florida).

Alternative 3.  Require a properly functioning NMFS certified VMS aboard all shrimp trawl vessels fishing in or transiting the EEZ of the Gulf of Mexico off Texas during any period in which only part of these waters are closed in conjunction with the Texas Closure.

Alternative 4.  Require a properly functioning NMFS certified VMS aboard all shrimp trawl vessels fishing in or transiting the EEZ of the Gulf of Mexico off the West Coast of Florida South of 29N. Latitude (Yankeetown, Florida) and require a properly functioning NMFS certified VMS aboard all shrimp trawl vessels fishing in or transiting the EEZ of the Gulf of Mexico off Texas during any period in which only part of these waters are closed in conjunction with the Texas Closure.

Alternative 5.   Require a properly functioning NMFS certified VMS aboard all shrimp trawl vessels fishing in or transiting the EEZ of the Gulf of Mexico.

17

Document info
Document views124
Page views124
Page last viewedSun Dec 04 04:33:33 UTC 2016
Pages52
Paragraphs605
Words22110

Comments