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Draft Chapter for Strategic Intelligence

policymakers and commanders tend to ignore intelligence, ask the wrong questions, or ask questions in such a way as to prejudice the answers.  There are three major problems that must be addressed if we are to improve all-source decision support to all relevant clients for intelligence:

1.  Scope.  We must acknowledge that all levels of all organizations need intelligence.  We cannot limit ourselves to “secrets for the President.”  If we fail to acknowledge the needs of lower-level policy makers, including all Cabinet members and their Assistant Secretaries; all acquisition managers, all operational commanders down to civil affairs and military police units; all logisticians; and all allied coalition elements including non-governmental organizations, then we are not being professional about applying the proven process of intelligence to the decision-support needs of key individuals responsible for national security and national prosperity.

2.  Competition.  We must acknowledge that open sources of information are vastly more influential in the domestic politics of all nations, and that it is not possible to be effective at defining requirements for secret intelligence decision-support in the absence of a complete grasp of what is impacting on the policy makers, managers, and commanders from the open sources world.  Consider the figure below.

Version 2.4 dated 7 April 2006

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