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Written for Moore's Rural New-Yorker.

VIRGINIA

DAEE.

BY MABGAKET MARSHALL.

AH8T thou tell me, sweet voice ftom out of the past, Which so long hast haunted Virginia's waters, Which hast mocked the hunter upon the mountains, And charmed in the vale her beautiful daughters;

Canst thou tell of the late of thy comrades in sorrow, By what wild forest tribe they were spirited away f Didst thou pine on in slavery, or perish by torture, That thy clear voice should haunt these forests to- day?

Dost thou call for revenge on thy swarthy-cheeked captors? They are faded away, to the sunset are gone; The pale-foce now rules, where the warrior stealthy, Put the torchtothe Bleeping colonist's home.

We are treading the soil so long called sacred, We are breaking the chains of the down-trodden slave, On the sod of the Old Dominion we're sleeping, While her sons in impotent fnry rave.

Be still, mocking echo! the war of the cannon Will soon drown thy voice, and the roll ofthe drums Will chase from our memories the white-robed phan- tom, That only in times of quietness comes.

Ah, why wilt thou haunt me? To tell that to-morrow

My body shall lie on the battle-red plain ? To say that a voice far sweeter than fancy

Shall welcome me home, ah! never again ?

Then awaytothy rest, leave me to my sorrow, Oh! mock me no more sweet spirit of air; And if I must die, thank GOD I die bravely- Soon, soon shall I join thee, VIRGINIA DABS.

Written for Moore's Rural New-Yorker.

PBESUMPTIOFS REWAED.

BY JENNIE BUCKBEE.

[Concludedfrompage 228, last number.]

On my return I learned that LOUISA had sent a servant inquiring to know why I was away so long from her. I determined at once to see her, and without taking off my things, went directly over. She met me at the door with the old

,

joyous welcome; altered manner.

apparently I enquired

not observing my for AUGUSTUS. A

shade of sadness came over her she said :

beautiful

face as

" Poor AUGUSTUS ! his mission at home this time is indeed a sad one. If I could only be with him!" she sighed naturally enough.

I was amazed.

"Can this,"

the artless LOUISA HARLOW ? learned dissimulation ? "

thought Has she

I, " b e eo well

But something in LOUISA'S manner silenced my prepared tongue. It clove to the roof of my mouth at every attempt at a beginning. I had no power to speak, and I departed witfl my mission unfulfilled.

As I sauntered home, disappointed and foiled, I reproached myself unmercifully for my unwonted

indecision.

Irresolution

besetting

sin.

To think

had

caused

the

failure

of

while

it chagrined

me.

had never been my that want of courage my mission, surprised Could it be possible

that that

LOUISA'S air of innocence was genuine, and I was a wicked, blundering accuser? I

repudiated the idea at once. tinued a flirtation while she

Had she not con- knew her husband

to be suffering ? with him nearly

Had she not been seen walking every day since AUGUSTUS left ?

" O h ! LOUISA," I exclaimed mentally, " i s this the quenchless, immortal love of which you

have

so

often

boasted

to

me?

Are

you

not

content with the entire devotion of such a nature as that of AUGUSTUS ?"

Then came other sible extenuation.

thoughts—thoughts of pos- Was not the swing-gate

down, without my ever having been fully inside?

How

did I know

but AUGUSTUS was

the veriest

tyrant

in private?

How did I know

but the

extremely affectionate for appreciation and

nature of LOUISA pined sympathy? Not because

all

the crumbs

dealt

out

to me

through

the

hated

gate

were

peace,

did I take

all peace

for

granted.

I had ever been looking for the of discord, and here they were!

first symptoms But oh! of so

different

a nature

from

what

I had

dreamed!

I

had been too tenderly circle, ever to view the

guarded,

in the home

remotest

approach to a

flirtation

bmong

married

people

with

toleration. \

The

least

I thought

of

now,

was

a

duel

;

and

the

irretrievable

ruin of all

and day that

this cup

parties. I prayed night might yet pass by the

Eden of my friends. But even while I prayed I could see them walking together, arm-in-arm, beneath my window. Once, unawares, I caught a glimpse of the brilliant, expressive face of LOUISA upturned to his, with a gaze of such worship, such soul-communion, such pride, as made me heart-sick and faint with terror. Then

I must believe! I knew too well the ardent na- ture of LOUISA, ever to expect such a look from her for a mere acquaintance. I t was, then, all over—LOUISA ruined, and AUGUSTUS' heart broken forever!

Now, while all these suspicions were being confirmed in my own mind, I do not think an- other person in her circle entertained a shadow of the like. In the first place the character of LOUISA stood very high, and all her antecedents militated against such a supposition. She was, doubtless, seen riding with him. But in a city, few observe. If they did observe, they supposed him to be a friend of AUGUSTUS. I alone knew better.

AUGUSTUS' protracted absence frightened me. I desired, yet dreaded, his return. As days and weeks passed, I grew almost sick with suspense. I feared that the telegram had been a mere ruse and that he was a wanderer upon the earth, or, horrible thought, had committed suicide!

Things went on in this way for nearly three weeks. It seemed three years to me. I believe

I grew very old during that time. I would not see LOUISA again. I had' made "up my mind, when things came to the worst, to adopt and protect my little namesake, CABBIE GBOVE, and I thought if poor ATJGusTUSnever came back, I would beg to take the little fatherless boy to my own home.

One day little JESSIB came running in, ex-

claiming, " CABBIE, Mr. GBOVE'S got back

I saw him

talking with the handsome minister.•'

I nearly fainted, with fright.

" Was he—were

they?" tence.

I scarcely knew how to word my sen- Finally I surprised the child with,

" Were they quarrelling ?" " I don't know, I'm sure," replied the child indifferently; "their backs were to me, but they were talking very fast.''

" Pistols, ten paces, a hearse," passed like a pall over my brain, blinding me with fear. I did not have to endure the suspense long. Not fifteen minutes had elapsed, ere I received a hasty summons from LOUISA, insisting upon my immediate presence at her house. Anticipating the worst, I did not even stop for my bonnet, but darted out all endesfiabiUe as I was, LOUISA met me at the door.

" Why! my dear CABRIB," said she smiling, " what is the matter ? Tou are whiter than a corpse."

"LOUISA," said I hoarsely, "how dare you?

  • what do you mean?—what are you smiiiDg

fOr?"|

;,H^!

"What do you mean?" repeated she, more soberly. " But do come in and warm you."

She almost dragged me into the room, where, as I entered, two gentlemen rose to receive me, each smiling a good-morning welcome, while LOUISA led me to a sofa by the fire. I was too much preoccupied to be embarrassed at my for- lorn appearance in the presence of strangers. Before I had rightly collected my thoughts,-I exclaimed,

"But—I thought—what does—O poor AU- GUSTUS !" and burst into tears. __^ What ails our pet, LOUISA?" said AUGUSTUS in distress.

" Come with LOUISA, taking

me to my room, darling," said

my arm.

"But, first, allow me

to introduce you to —my brother, a»d she presented the villain!"

Mr.

LTON

!"

Had a thunderbolt struck me, I could not

have been more startled.

"But —I—thought" —said I, incoherently, " that he was — your lover."

At this, LOUISA burst into a merry laugh, and I furtively saw that the stranger was almost ir- resistably inclined to join, but through polite-

ness suppressed the inclination. soon sobered.

But LOUISA

" I had not thought of that," she said, mus- ingly; "but —I might have known—and did you really think so CABBIE ?"

"Certainly, why should I not?" 6aid I, my mercury beginning to rise, as I comprehended the great idiot I had been making of myself.

"Ah ! I remember now that was why you re- fused our company so disdainfully, on that eve- ning. You really overpowered my poor brother with your melo-dramatic air. And that is why you have absented yourself so much of late. Strange that I should not have seen this."

"But you!" said I, burning to AUGUSTUS a little reproachfully.

" I own, CARRIE, I was almost jealous of LOUISA that night; and being obliged to leave next morning, had no time to understand mat- ters. But I thank heaven I had too much confi- dence in my wife to let a doubt grow into jealousy. I saw enough to make me a little uncomfortable while I was gone, but I could not, would not believe my wife untrue without

more proof. I cannot be thankful enough now, that I had sense enough to await the issue."

"tAnd all this, because of my simple ruse to carry on a pleasant little charade," said LOUISA, a little sorrowfully.

" Bather my own blindness," said Mr. LTON, feelingly, " i n thus causing unnecessary pain. But my sole excuse is that it was entirely unin- tentional and unpremeditated."

He extended to me his hand, and looked into my face with an expression in his clear, pene- trating eyes, which sent all the truant blood back into my cheeks. Why did he- not pity AUGUSTUS, rather than me ? for I knew t!aat he had suffered, although he would scarce acknowl- edge it, even to himself.

When LOUISA was a child, Mr. LTON had left home to embark in trade, in one of the South Sea Islands, where, by years of industry and perseverance, he had acquire^ a very large fortune. This he had now come to spend among his friends. His return was unexpected to LOUISA; but it had been a long-standing, pet idea of hers, to surprise her husband some day with the apparition of a full-grown, noble brother; for, strange as it may seem, AUGUSTUS had never known of this brother. Indeed, his having known little of LOUISA'S early life, aided the deception.

" I did not dare tell you, CABBIE," said she, mischievously, "because I knew your mobility of expression so well, that I felt you would be- tray me before AUGUSTUS had become acquainted with him, and learned to love him as I did."

Had she known what I had suffered, she would not wonder that I forgave her—hardly.

. It was not long before I caught the astute Mrs. GBOVE, (my former artless friend, LOUISA HAB- LOW,) enlisted in the, to me, still more danger- ous villainy of match-making! She, however, strenuously denied all originality in the scheme, declaring it to be with her brother an unmiti- gated case of " love at first sight!" I experi- enced spasms of combativeness in being caught even in LOUISA'S match-making toils, but caught I wast and here were all my " old maid" notes and mortgages to be buried in the grave of matrimony!

But I had curiously essayed to pass behind the sacred curtain of wedlock, and therein had met

the fate which usually befalls wicbedly audacious spies—that of eatirig the bitter apple of ridicule before all parties, and learning that, while I had been foolishly and insanely wearing myself out, sounding the outer walls and storming the castle, all within was as tranquil as peace!

NATIONAL W I T .

ITALIAN wit is highly dramatic, spontaneous,

earns

Among his living

its proverbs are—" The ^dog

by wagging

his tail."

"Make

yourself

all

honey,

and the flies will

devour

it."

" The smiles of a pretty woman of the purse." " He who takes an

are the tears eel by the tail,

or a woman by the tongue, empty handed.

is

sure

to come

off

The characteristic of Spanish wit is excessive;

stateliness.

Of the proverbs,

" H e who his

nothing

to do, let him buy a ship

or marry a

wife."

"From

many children and little

bread,

good Lord deliver us."

" A fool is never a good

fool unless he knows Latin."

F r e n c h w i t i s c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y y i n e s K , b r i l l i a n c y , In repartee the French dexterity, point, brevity.

are unrivalled.

Their conversation is not only

an

art, but

a fine art. In pruning

they are u^-

equaled.

In

no

literature

are Jthere

so many

proverbs which speak disparagingly of the fair sex. "Man is fire, woman is tow—the devil

comes and blows."

" A woman conceals only

what she doesn't know."

" To get chickens orie

must coax the hen." " Scratch they itch."—Prof. AngeU.-

people

where

1^*" Bulwer Lytton says that a refined gentle- man may always be known by the perfumes he uses. In American society it is recognized as a mark of elevated taste to patronize Phalon's " Night-Blooming Cereus." Its purity. fre4h- ness, and-delicacy commend it to all persons' Of poetic taste and feeling. Sold everywhere.

ACTIONS, looks, words, steps, form the alpha- bet by which you may spell characters.—Lav-

atcr.

'•

For Moore's Rural New-Yorker. MISCELLANEOUS ENIGMA.

I AH composed of 68 letters. My 25,17,19,28, 31 is one of the elements. My 33, 8,56 42, 8 is an amphibious animal. My 10, 5,9, 59, 55, 2, 80, 49, 21, 61 is one of our recent

victories. My 61, 87, BO, 68 is more valuable than my 50,14,1, My 35,27,61,13,18,17,40 is one of the Cabinet. My 63,20,49, 63,24,29,62,12, 60, 45, 46 is one of the

books of the Old Testament. My 41, 58, 50,24, $1, 8, 7,88, 6 is one of the greatest

discoveries of the age. My 34,11,40,2,89, 86 is one of the United States. My 52, 7, 49, 50,15, 35 is what we all possess. My 4, 8,30,55, 87,62,84,47 is a prominent contributor

to the Rural. My 18,1,12,40,39, 57 is a girl's name. My 60,40,22,11,12, 62, 61, 32,40 is a city in Michigan. My 80,46, 21, 82,12 was a poet. My 44,42,26, 50, 43,23 is what we often fail to appre-

ciate. My 2, 33,50,48,12 was one of the seven wise men Of

Greece. My 47,16,48,51 is an article of drees. My 25,57,54,51, 58 made into 18,50,60,49,31 becomes

an article 48, 52, 56, 21,7, 68,14. My whole may be found in one of the Psalms.

Grand Haven, Mich.

JENNIE M. S. ROSE.

@T* Answer In two weeks.

For Moore's Bural New-Yorker. GRAMMATICAL ENIGMA.

I am composed of 20 letters. My 12, 2,14 is an adverb. My 15,8, 8 is a personal pronoun. My 18,12, 5,14 is a verb.. My 1,16, 9,19 is an adverb. My 9,13 is an article. My 1,10,12 is a noun. My 16,20 is a conjunction. My 4, 8,12 is a verb. My 11,5, 9,17,12 is a verb. My 6, 8, 7,5 is a pronominal adjective.

?t -

My whole is the name of a family newspaper.

Caroline, Tompkins Co., N. Y. 83?" Answer in two weeks.

, SAIXIB.

For Moore's Bural New-Yorker. AN ANAGBAM.

VIEG em eth anm swohe arestne athre Ot dipprnle Bi veer ruet, Eno how omfr gihrt lowdu ont tedarp, Ghhtuloa a wconr eerw alepde ni wive. A nma hsowe rcpnilepi saavil Ni yerve lecap—eeerrhvw detir— Noe ni ohwes lous hte erut lvrpsaei, LOghutah eth mitteduul deerdi. Constantia Center, N. Y. LENA.

JEST* Answer in two weeks.

JEfor Moore's Rural New-Yorker. ANAGBAMS OF BATTLES.

Lime in glass,

Men bolt,

I count a red man,

The sin crew,

Oh lord crab,

Cow skins reel.

^F~ Answer in two weeks.

ANSWER TO ENIGMAS, &C, IN No. 807.

Answer to Miscellaneous Enigma t—Give me liberty or give me death, Answer to Riddle:—Ba-klng.

Answer to Anagram: Childhood, sweet and sunny childhood, With its careless, thoughtless air; Like the verdant, tangled wildwood, Untrained by the hand of care.. See it springing all around us, Glad to know, and quick to learn, Asking questions that confound us, Teaching lessons in its turn.

gOOD BOO

Alcoholic

twr a Patent Medicine.

P0E PAEMERS AND OTHERS. ORANGE JTJDD,

JJTSPEPSIA,

And all Diseases resulting from Disorders of tte

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41

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From the Eev. Levi G. Beck, Pastor of the Baptist Church'. Pemberton, N. J., formerly of the North Baptist Church, Philadelphia.

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5 00 H a r a s z t h y G r a p e C u l t u r e , & c H a r r i s ' I n j u r i o u s I n s e c t s , p l a i n 1 8 , 5 0 ; c o l o r e d 4 5 0 H e r b e r t ' s H i n t s t o H i H i n t s t o R i f l e m e n , b y _ _ " " " t r y g o o d , c u l t u r a l p e G a r t h e H t o B 1 7 5 H O T n p ' s L f . n c s t r o t ! L I n s l e y ' g ( _ . M a y h e V ' B l l V M a y h e w ' » W M o M a h o n ' s i M y F a r m a t E d g e w o o d N o r t o n ' s S c i e n t i f i c A g r i c u l t u r e O n i o n C u l t u r e , v e r y g o o d . . . ; , O u r F a r m o f F o u r A c r e s ( b o u n d ) 6 0 c ; p a p e r . P a r d e e o n S t r a w b e r r y C u l t u r e P e d d e r ' s L a n d M e a s u r e r Q u i n b y ' s M y s t e eeuers.. r i e s o f B e e - K e e p i n g . . . . . ' 150 40 175 2 00 . R a b b i t F a n c i e r R a n d a l l ' lastofMarcn)'.!!!'. ry. s S h nston's e e p H u s b a n d r y i J K R a n d a l l ' s F i n e w o o l S h e e p H u s b a n d r y 1 t R a n d ' s F l o w e r s f o r P a r l o r a n d G a r d e n S h e p h e r d ' s O w n B o o k S k i l l f u l H o u s e w i f e S m i t h ' s L a n d s c a p e G a r d e n i n g 1 5 0 S p e n c e r ' s E d u c a t i o n o f C h i l d r e n , l 5 0 S t e w a r t ' s ( J o h n ) S t a b l e B o o k 1 5 0 T e n A c r e s E n o u g h . . . . . T h a e r ' s ( A . D . ) F r l n c l ; 1 5 0 ^ » t . . i L O U - l e s o f A g r i c u l t u r e nchar's , T h o m a s ' F r n 2 00 150 1 50 350 3 50 2 75 00 2 75 i t C u l t u r i s t T h o m p s o n ' s F o o d o f A n i m a l s . - . - , J T o b a c c o C u l t u r e , v e r Miles on the Horse's foot y g o o f l . . . . . . . . T o d d ' s ( S . E . ) Y o u n g F a r m e r ' s M a n u a l From Rev. J. Newton Brown, D. D., Editor of the Ency- ,. , V a n x ' s V i l l a s a n d C o t t a g W 80 TO X l% SC e s W a r 3w K « 2 25 d e r ^ H clopedia of Religious Edowledge.and Christian Chroni- cle, Philadelphia. e d g e B a n d E v e r s n : e « B 8 . . , , . . . . . . . T M « f l i > l W a t s o n ' s A m B n c a n H o n i e a a r d e n . ' . i . . . . . . i J * - . . T . r ; 2 0 0 w a x F l o w e r s ( A r t o f M a k i n g ) 1 5 0 W o o d w a r d ' s C o u n t r y H o m e s ; . . . . . . . . 1 5 0 Y o u a t t a n d S p o o n e r o n t h e H o r s e . . , 1 5 0 Y o n a t t a n d M a r t i n o n C a t t l e Y o u a t t o n t h e H o g Y o u a t t o n S h e e p Y o u m a n s ' H o u s e h o l d S c i e W