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What can you tell a Non-Mason about Masonry?

Masonry does things in the world.

Masonry teaches that each person has a responsibility to make things better in the world. Most individuals won’t be the ones to find a cure for cancer, or eliminate poverty, or help create world peace, but every man and woman and child can do something to help others and to make things a little better. Masonry is deeply involved with helping peopleit spends more than $2 million dollars every day in the United States, just to make life a little easier. And a great majority of that help goes to people who are not Masons. Some of the charities are vast projects, like the Crippled Children’s Hospitals and Burns Institutes built by the Shriners. Also, Scottish Rite Masons maintain a nationwide network of over 100 Childhood Language Disorders Clinics, Centers, and Programs. Each helps children afflicted by such conditions as aphasia, dyslexia, stuttering, and related learning or speech disorders.

Some services are less noticeable, like helping a widow pay her electric bill or buying coats and shoes for disadvantaged children. And there’s just about anything you can think of in-between. But with projects large or small, the Masons of a lodge try to help make the world a better place. The lodge gives them a way to combine with others to do even more good.

This article is reprinted from “What’s a Mason?”, a publication of the Masonic Information Center and will be continued throughout the year. Look for more excerpts in future Trestleboards.

A Mason is not necessarily a member of a lodge. In a broad sense, he is any person who daily tries to live the Masonic life, and to serve intelligently the needs of the Great Architect.

Dear Brother, At Grand Lodge, we're in a crucial phase of Operation Greatest Gift. We've already begun filling seats for April 15 and April 22 flights to the World War II Memorial - and we need your referrals for veterans and volunteer guardians. Right now, all Masons who are World War II veterans have priority - but after March 31 we'll open the April flights to all World War II veterans. If we don't have your referrals by then, many deserving brothers may miss out on the trip of a lifetime. Of course, there will also be flights in May - but we want you to know about the April flights before it's too late. Talk with your lodge brothers and identify those who are interested in the trip, then give referrals to your lodge secretary (unless your lodge has designated another officer as the Operation Greatest Gift point of contact). Submit names to your secretary/designated officer for

Masons who are World War II veterans who would like to be considered for a trip to the Memorial

Masons or non-Masons who are over 18 and interested in accompanying a trip as a volunteer guardian Thank you for your support for this cause, and for all you do as a lodge leader. Secretaries: It's important that you provide the following information for each member referral: full member name, Member ID, address, and phone number. Send referrals to Joyce Hahn, Foundation programs coordinator, by e-mail to jhahn@freemason.org; by mail to 1111 California St., San Francisco, CA 94108; or by phone at 415/292-9139.

ARE YOU A MASON WHO SERVED IN WORLD WAR II? WOULD YOU LIKE TO VISIT THE WWII MEMORIAL IN WASHINGTON DC (Expenses Paid)?

WOULD YOU LIKE TO SERVE AS AN ESCORT FOR A MASONIC WORLD WAR II VETERAN (Pay Your Own Way)?

THEN CALL BROTHER BOB KENNEDY, PM (805-736-4881), LET HIM KNOW AND HE WILL SUBMIT YOUR NAME TO GRAND LODGE.

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