X hits on this document

PDF document

Estimated costs for livestock fencing - page 4 / 4

7 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

4 / 4

Table 6. Annual average ownership cost by fence type (Based on a 1,320 ft. fence)

Depreciation

$ 99

$ 81

$ 59

$ 37

Interest on investment

79

65

59

37

Maintenance

159

129

74

46

TOTAL COST/YEAR

$ 338

$ 274

$ 193

$ 121

TOTAL COST/FOOT/YR.

$ 0.26

$ 0.21

$ 0.15

$ 0.09

Item

Woven wire

Barbed wire

Estimated useful life (yr)

20

20

High-tensile

High-tensile

8%

nonelectric (8-strand) 25 5%

electric (5-strand) 25 5%

8%

Average annual mainte (% of initial cost)

nance

  • 3.

    Three wires—barbed with at least 36 two-point iron barbs or 26 four-point iron barbs—on each rod of wire, or of four wires (two barbed and two smooth) to be firmly fastened to posts not more than two rods apart with not less than two stays between posts, or with posts more than one rod apart without such stays, the top wire to be 48-54 inches in height.

  • 4.

    Wire either wholly or in part, substantially built and kept in good repair with the lowest or bottom rail, wire, or board 16-20 inches above the ground; the top rail, wire, or board 48-54 inches in height and the middle rail, wire, or board 12-18 inches above the bottom rail, wire, or board.

  • 5.

    A fence consisting of four parallel, coated steel, smooth high-tensile wires that meets requirements adopted by the American Society of Testing and Materials, including but not limited to require- ments that relate to grade, tensile strength, elonga- tion, dimensions, and tolerances of the wire. The wire must be firmly fastened to plastic, metal, or wooden posts securely planted in the earth. The posts shall not be more than two rods apart. The top wire shall be at least 40 inches in height.

  • 6.

    Any other kind of fence that the fence viewers consider to be equivalent to a lawful fence or which meets the standards established by the Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship by rule as equivalent to a lawful fence.

References The following materials were used to develop cost and supply estimates for this publication:

  • “Comparative costs of fence construction,” in Rangelands 10(5):224-226.

  • “Electric fencing,” in Rangelands 9(4):153-155.

  • “Fencing strategies for livestock producers: An analysis of comparative costs of traditional and high-tensile fences,” in the Journal of the American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers 50(1):52-57.

  • Fence Systems for Grazing Management by Jim Gerrish, published by the University of Missouri Forage Research Center, Linneus, Mo.

  • Fencing Systems for CRP Land, CRP-8, by Dan Morrical, Grant Wells and Shawn Shouse, pub- lished by Iowa State University Extension, August

1996.

  • “Low cost diagonal fence strainer,” in Rangelands

7(1):24-27.

Prepared by Ralph Maye , former extension farm man- agement specialist and revised by Tom Olsen, extension farm management specialist.

File: Economics 1-8

. . . and justice for all The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orienta- tion, and marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Many materials can be made available in alternative formats for ADA clients. To file a complaint of discrimination, write

USDA, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 14th and Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call 202- 720-5964. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Stanley R. Johnson, director, Cooperative Extension Service, Iowa State University of Science and Technology, Ames, Iowa.

Document info
Document views7
Page views7
Page last viewedSat Oct 29 00:04:47 UTC 2016
Pages4
Paragraphs290
Words1869

Comments