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The Journal of Specialised Translation

Issue 8 - July 2007

drafting phase; at the other end of the scale were people who did most of their revision as they drafted the translation, so that there was relatively little left to be done during post-drafting. I can add that this difference is regularly reported by professionals attending self- revision workshops; I call the former approach ‘steamrolling’ through the text.

9. Jakobsen, Arnt Lykke (2002) “Translation drafting by professional translators and by translation students.” Empirical Translation Studies: Process and Product. Copenhagen Studies in Language 27,

191-204.

In this study,

4 student translators and

4

professionals each

translated four texts—two Danish-English and two English-Danish, and their keystrokes were recorded. An analysis was then made of the time devoted to each of three phases: orientation (pre-drafting), drafting and post-drafting. Unsurprisingly, the professionals were able to complete the drafting phase more quickly than the students. More interestingly, they spent more time on the post-drafting phase than the students, yet made fewer changes during this phase (as was also found by Englund Dimitrova in her later study). Once a professional

had set a wording down in the drafting likely to survive the post-drafting stage.

phase, it was much more

All subjects were Danish speakers, and differences between L1-L2 and L2-L1 difference pertains to self-revision: both

Jakobsen briefly mentions work, though only one professionals and students

did slightly more revision during the drafting phase when working into L2. This is a subject worthy of more study since so many professional translators work into L2.

A related matter that might be worth studying is the ability of native speakers of the target language to detect mistranslations when revising the work of others. It would be of interest to take a draft translation prepared by a native speaker of the target language and give it to a group of revisers half of whom are native speakers of TL (with SL as second language) and half of whom are native speakers of SL (with TL as second

language), and mistranslations.

see

whether

they

are

equally

good

at

finding

3. Work Habits and Workplace Procedures

The studies considered so far are concerned with the wording of the text. However self-revision and other-revision can also be studied in terms of the methods used in a workplace and personal revision habits.

15

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