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percent during his administration.11 With an agenda of internationalism, President Camacho

worked hard to improve relations with the United States.

Under the leadership of President Camacho, México was also able to define its position

in the war and broaden its relationship with the United States. Ill sentiments left by President

Cárdenas’ nationalistic policies were set aside, the U.S. now saw México as an essential trading

partner and ally.

This relationship culminated in the formation of the Mexican Fighter Squadron 201, or as

it is recognized by many, Escuadrón 201. The service of these 300 Mexican soldiers forever

changed how México was perceived by the world.

Wartime Relations and the Mexican Fighter Squadron 201

It was only a day after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, that México

was once again forced to re-evaluate her European trading partners. México severed its

relationship with Germany and Italy on December 11, 1941 and once more expressed full

support to the Allies.12 President Roosevelt congratulated México for this decision in a letter

written to President Camacho and promoted that the country have a stronger stance in the war.

The Mexican government took heavy security measures and a great effort was made to protect

the railways, and the Gulf of México. México worked hard to ensure the safe transport of war

materials to the United States. Raw materials such as zinc, copper, lead, mercury, and graphite

were shipped to the United States. México also agreed to set price controls on their products

during the duration of the war.13 México’s opposition for the Axis culminated in the deportation

11 12 John Edwin Fagg, Latin America: A General History (London: The Macmillan Company, 1969), 554. Stephen R. Niblo, War, Diplomacy, and Development: The United States and México 1938-1954 (Wilmington: Scholarly Resources Inc., 1995), 77. Michael C. Meyer, William L. Sherman, and Susan M. Deeds, The Course of Mexican History, 609. 13

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