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  • 5.

    New York County, Office of the Register, Liber Deeds and Conveyances; NYC, Dept. of Buildings (NB-385-

    • 1902)

      ; St. Aloysius R.C. Church, 100th Anniversary St. Aloysius R.C. Church, Harlem, New York, 1899-1999

      • (N.

        Y.: 1999); “St. Aloysius,” Works Progress Administration Inventory of the Church Archives in New York City (Roman Catholic Church) (N.Y.: Histl. Recs. Survey, 1941), entry 116; “In the Real Estate Field,” New York Times (NYT), Dec. 10, 1899, 14; “Recorded Real Estate Transfers,” and “In the Real Estate Field,” NYT, Jan. 24, 1900, 12; “St. Aloysius Parish Entertainment,” NYT, Apr. 27, 1900, 9; “The Building Department,”

NYT, June 19, 1902, 14; “New Edifice for St. Aloysius,” NYT, Aug. 2, 1902, 6; “Miscellaneous,” Real Estate Record & Builders Guide, Aug. 16, 1902. 235; “Many Churches Building,” NYT, Nov. 15, 1903, 10; “What’s Going on in City Churches,” The Catholic News, Apr. 16, 1904, 18; “Church of St. Aloysius Dedicated,” NYT, Apr. 18, 1904, 5; “The New Church of St. Aloysius,” The Catholic News, Apr. 23, 1904, 3; “Death of Father McKenna,” The Catholic News, Sept. 20, 1913, 3.

  • 6.

    There are currently no locatable records from the Dept. of Buildings on the church. A note in the files of LPC dating from 1966 indicates that the church plans were signed by architect Henry H. Holly, apparently then in the employ of the Renwick firm.

  • 7.

    Aug. 2, 1902.

  • 8.

    Nov. 15, 1903.

  • 9.

    The other central Harlem parish churches are: St. Joseph of the Holy Family (1860; 1871; 1889, Herter Bros.), 405 West 125th Street; All Saints (1889-93, Renwick, Aspinwall & Russell), 47 East 129th Street; St. Charles Borromeo (1901, George H. Streeton), 211 West 141st Street; St. Thomas the Apostle (1904-07, Thomas H. Poole & Co.), 262 West 118th Street; St. Mark the Evangelist (1907-08, George F. Pelham), 65 West 138th Street; and Resurrection (1908), 276 West 151st Street.

  • 10.

    Dennis S. Francis, Architects in Practice, New York City 1840-1900 (N.Y.: Comm. for the Pres. of Archl. Recs., 1979); James Ward, Architects in Practice, New York City 1900-1940 (N.Y.: Comm. for the Pres. of Archl. Recs., 1989); W.W. Renwick obit., NYT, Mar. 16, 1933, 20; “William Whetten Renwick,” Who Was Who in America 1 (Chicago: Marquis Who’s Who, 1981), 1022; Selma Rattner, “James L. Aspinwall,” Macmillan Encyclopedia of Architects 1 (N.Y.: Macmillan Co., 1982), 109-110; Aspinwall obit., NYT, May 16, 1936, II, 9; LPC, Tribeca West Historic District Designation Report (LP-1713) (N.Y.: City of New York,

    • 1991)

      ; LPC, architects files.

  • 11.

    Both churches are designated New York City Landmarks.

  • 12.

    The school is part of the designated New York City Landmark and the Grace Church complex is a designated New York City Landmark.

  • 13.

    This building is a designated New York City Landmark.

  • 14.

    Rattner; Aspinwall obit. This building is a designated New York City Landmark.

  • 15.

    This building is part of the N.Y.C. Farm Colony-Seaview Hospital Historic District.

  • 16.

    Grueby Faience Co., advertisement, Brickbuilder (Jan. 1905), 57; Herbert Croly, “The Use of Terra Cotta in the United States; How It Has Increased. No. 1,” Architectural Record (July 1905), 87; Montgomery Schuyler, “Italian Gothic in New York,” Architectural Record (July 1909), 46-51; Susan Tunick, Terra-Cotta Skyline (Princeton: Princeton Archl. Pr., 1997), 149; Michael H. Adams, Harlem Lost and Found: An Architectural and Social History, 1765-1915 (N.Y.: Monacelli Pr., 2002), 197-201.

  • 17.

    St. Aloysius’s main entrance has terra-cotta moldings similar to those on the main entrance of W.W. Renwick’s Church of All Saints School, which was built at the same time. The school’s terra cotta has been painted.

  • 18.

    The two extant buildings are designated New York City Landmarks.

  • 19.

    Tunick, 62.

  • 20.

    This building is a designated New York City Landmark.

  • 21.

    The Montauk Club is located within the Park Slope Historic District; the other buildings are designated New York City Landmarks.

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