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born brewmeister, H.S. Gilbert. It’s a place where you can sit back and have a cold beverage, whether it is a Montana Microbrew or a soda pop. Enjoy lots of musical numbers, comedy sketches, and just plain silliness. The show is risque, some- times bawdy, and can involve social and political commentary, but it doesn’t have violence or nudi- ty, and they don’t use “four letter words.” Kids are welcome if you don’t mind exposing them to an environment where adults drink beer, laugh heartily, and may be called on to make fools of themselves. The show goes on from the end of May through Labor Day, with two shows a day, seven days a week. Reservations are highly recom- mended. Be sure and visit them on the web.

L The Bennett House Country Inn

115 E Idaho St in Virginia City. 843-5220 or 877-843-5220

17.

Virginia City

elaborate oak meat cooler with beveled mirrors intact. This unusual example of 1880s state-of-the-art equip- ment stands sixteen feet high. Gohn advertised that his cooler was always well stocked with beef, veal, pork, game fowl and mutton and that his peddling wagons were “run regularly up and down the gulch.”

H Pfouts and Russel (Rank’s Drug-Old Masonic Temple)

Virginia City

Paris Pfouts, Vigilante president and Virginia City’s first mayo , was instrumental in laying out the town. He and his partne , Samuel Russell, built a log store on this site in summe , 1863. Local hell-raiser Jack Slade was arrested here on March 10, 1864 and, in an exe- cution controvesial even amoung the Vigilantes, hanged on a corral gatepost behind the building. Pfouts and Russell constructed the present building in 1865. Lime was not yet available for morta , so the stone walls were secured with adobe mud. A loyal Mason, Pfouts gave the second floor to the Masonic Lodge. There the Grand Lodge of Montana A.F. & A.M. was founded on January 24, 1866. W.W. Morris moved his drug store, established in the Hangman’s Building in 1864, to this location circa 1877. C.W. Rank bought the business in 1889. He and his wife ran it until 1946. Now housing the oldest continuously-operated business in Montana, the building has been little altered since the 1860s.

T Virginia City Historical Museum

Virginia City

T Alder Gulch Short Line

Virginia City. 843-5377

The Short Line is a narrow gauge railroad that runs between Virginia City and Nevada city. The 1.25 mile trip is a favorite with kids. The train’s

engineer entertains you during the entire trip with narratives of the area’s history. Early June to late- August. There is an admission charge.

T Alder Gulch River of Gold

Virginia City. 843-5402

Whether you just want to see how placer gold was mined during Virginia City’s gold boom, or do a little gold panning yourself, you’ll find this an enjoyable stop for every member of the family. An outdoor mining museum displays dredging equip- ment and other mining artifacts. You can pan for gold and garnets with a little professional help.

T The Brewery Follies

210 E Cover in Virginia City. 843-5218 or 800-829-2969, Ext no 3. www.breweryfollies.com. vcfollies@bresnan.net

The Brewery Follies is a remarkable revue and an historical experience in a cabaret atmosphere. The always fun and captivating show takes place in Montana’s first brewery, built in 1863 by German

Lakeview George Shambrow served as postmaster when the settlement’s first post office opened in 1897. Although the town sustained itself through the early 1900s, a decreasing population forced the postal service’s closure in 1938. Today, Lakeview is a tiny village.

H Beaverhead Rock Hwy 41 N of Dillon

On August 10, 1805, members of the Lewis and Clark expedition pushed their way up the Jefferson River’s tributaries toward the Continental Divide and the Pacific Ocean beyond. Toward afternoon they sighted what Clark called a “remarkable Clift” to the west. Sacajawea (o , as Lewis spelled it: Sahcahgarweah), their Indian guide for this portion of the trip, said her tribe called the large promontory “Beaver’s head.”

Both Lewis and Clark agreed on the rock’s likeness to the fur-bearing animal and recorded the name in their journals. They continued south only to encounter a heavy rain and hail storm. “the men defended them- selves from the hail by means of the willow bushes but all the party got perfectly wet,” Lewis said. They camped upstream from the Beaver’s head, enjoyed freshly killed deer meat, then pushed on the next day.

Beaverhead Rock served as an important landmark not only for Lewis and Clark, but also for the trappers, miners, and traders who followed them into the vicinity. It is the namesake for the county in which it is now located, retaining the same appearance that inspired Sacajawea and her people to name it centuries ago.

Jan

Feb

March

April

May

June

July

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Annual

31.6

38.0

43.6

54.5

64.1

73.1

82.8

81.3

70.2

58.7

42.4

33.4

56.2

9.8

14.8

19.5

28.1

36.4

43.7

48.8

47.6

39.0

30.7

20.0

12.4

29.2

0.27

0.24

0.53

0.89

1.73

1.85

1.03

0.99

0.96

0.55

0.38

0.26

9.68

4.9

3.8

7.6

6.5

2.6

0.1

0.0

0.0

1.3

2.9

4.2

4.1

38.0

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

Dillon

Average Max. Temperature (F) Average Min. Temperature (F) Average Total Precipitation (in.) Average Total SnowFall (in.) Average Snow Depth (in.)

www.ultimatemontana.com

183

Section 6

BUTTE, DILLON, & VIRGINIA CITY AREA

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