X hits on this document

20 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

5 / 7

Comprehensive Report Species - Notemigonus crysoleucas

Separation Justification: Data on dispersal and other movements generally are not available. In some species, individuals may migrate variable distances between spawning areas and nonspawning habitats.

Separation distances (in aquatic kilometers) for cyprinids are arbitrary but reflect the presumption that movements and appropriate separation distances generally should increase with fish size. Hence small, medium, and large cyprinids, respectively, have increasingly large separation distances. Separation distance reflects the likely low probability that two occupied locations separated by less than many kilometers of aquatic habitat would represent truly independent populations over the long term.

Because of the difficulty in defining suitable versus unsuitable habitat, especially with respect to dispersal, and to simplify the delineation of occurrences, a single separation distance is used regardless of habitat quality.

Occupied locations that are separated by a gap of 15 km or more of any aquatic habitat that is not known to be occupied represent different occurrences. However, it is important to evaluate seasonal changes in habitat to ensure that an occupied habitat occurrence for a particular population does not artificially separate spawning areas and nonspawning areas as different occurrences simply because there have been no collections/observations in an intervening area that may exceed the separation distance. Date: 21Sep2004 Author: Hammerson, G.

Population/Occurrence Viability

  • ---

    Jump to Section---

Authors/Contributors

  • ---

    Jump to Section---

Element Ecology & Life History Edition Date: 26Aug1993 Element Ecology & Life History Author(s): Hammerson, G.

Zoological data developed by NatureServe and its network of natural heritage programs (see Local Programs) and other contributors and cooperators (see Sources).

References

  • ---

    Jump to Section---

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

ALLEN, CRAIG R., STEPHEN DEMARAIS, AND R. SCOTT LUTZ. 1994. RED IMPORTED FIRE ANT IMPACT ON WILDLIFE: AN OVERVIEW. TEXAS J. SCI. 46(1):51-59. Atton, F.M. and J.J. Merkowsky. 1983. Atlas of Saskatchewan Fish. Saskatchewan Department of Parks and Renewable Resources, Fisheries Branch Technical Report 83-2. 281pp. Becker, G. C. 1983. Fishes of Wisconsin. Univ. Wisconsin Press, Madison. 1052 pp. Douglas, Neil H. 1974. Freshwater fishes of Louisiana. Claitor's publ. div. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 443 pp. Etnier, David A. and Wayne C. Starnes. 1993. The Fishes of Tennessee. University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville. 681 pp. FORNEY, J.L. 1957. BAIT FISH PRODUCTION IN NEW YORK PONDS. N.Y. FISH GAME J. 4(2):150-194. GEORGE, C.J. 1980. THE FISHES OF THE ADIRONDACK PARK. NYS DEPT. ENVIRON. CONSERV. ALBANY, NY 94 PP. Hoover, E.E. (ED.) 1938. Biological Survey of the Merrimack Watershed. Survey Report No.3. New Hampshire Fish and Game Department., Concord. 238 pp. La Rivers, I. 1994. Fishes and fisheries of Nevada. University of Nevada Press, Reno. 782 pp. Lee, D. S., C. R. Gilbert, C. H. Hocutt, R. E. Jenkins, D. E. McAllister, and J. R. Stauffer, Jr. 1980. Atlas of North American Freshwater Fishes. North Carolina State Museum of Natural History. 867 pp. Page, L. M., and B. M. Burr. 1991. A field guide to freshwater fishes: North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 432 pp. ROSS, STEPHEN T. 1996. INLAND FISHES OF MISSISSIPPI. SELECTED SPECIES ACCOUNTS. COAUTHORED WITH W. M. BRENNEMAM, W.T. SLACK, M.T. O'CONNELL, AND T.L. PETERSON. ILLUSTRATED BY D.G. ROSS. DRAFT COPY. Robins, C. R., et al. 1991. Common and scientific names of fishes from the United States and Canada. American Fisheries Society, Special Publishing 20. 183 pp. Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management. 1996. The Fisheries Regulations being Chapter F-16.1 Reg 1 (effective 9 May 1995) as ammended by Saskatchewan Regulations 13/96. Scarola, J.F. 1973. Freshwater Fishes of New Hampshire. New Hampshire Fish and Game Department. 131 pp.

http://www.natureserve.org/explorer/servlet/NatureServe?...radiobutton&selectedIndexes=103602&menuselectfooter=none (5 of 7)5/18/2005 2:29:54 PM

Document info
Document views20
Page views20
Page last viewedTue Jan 17 03:39:25 UTC 2017
Pages7
Paragraphs165
Words2513

Comments