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IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SPEECH AND AUDIO PROCESSING, VOL. 10, NO. 8, NOVEMBER 2002

[4] L. Deng, A. Acero, M. Plumpe, and X. D. Huang, “Large-vocabulary speech recognition under adverse acoustic environments,” in Proc. Int. Conf. on Spoken Language, vol. 3, Beijing, China, Oct. 2000, pp. 806–809. [5] L. Deng, A. Acero, L. Jiang, J. Droppo, and X. D. Huang, “High-per- formance robust speech recognition using stereo training data,” in Proc. Int. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, Salt Lake City, UT, Apr. 2001. [6] L. Deng, J. Droppo, and A. Acero, “Recursive estimation of nonsta- tionary noise using a nonlinear model with iterative stochastic approx- imation,” in Proc. Automatic Speech Recognition and Understanding, Dec. 2001. , “Robust speech recognition using iterative stochastic approxi- mation and recursive EM for estimation of nonstationary noise,” IEEE Trans. Speech Audio Processing, 2001, submitted for publication. , “Log-domain speech feature enhancement using sequential MAP noise estimation and a phase-sensitive model of the acoustic environ- ment,” in Proc. Int. Conf. on Spoken Language Processing, Denver, CO, Sep. 2002. [9] De Veth et al., “Feature vector selection to improve ASR robustness in noisy conditions,” in Proc. Eurospeech Conf., Aalborg, Denmark, Sept. 2001. [10] J. Droppo, L. Deng, and A. Acero, “Efficient on-line acoustic envi- ronment estimation for FCDCN in a continuous speech recognition system,” in Proc. Int. Conf. Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, Salt Lake City, UT, Apr. 2001. , “Evaluation of SPLICE on the Aurora2 and Aurora3 tasks,” in Proc. Int. Conf. on Spoken Language Processing, Denver, CO, Sept. 2002. [12] , “Evaluation of the SPLICE algorithm on the Aurora2 database,” in Proc. Eurospeech Conf., Aalborg, Demark, Sept. 2001. [13] J. Droppo, A. Acero, and L. Deng, “A nonlinear observation model for removing noise from corrupted speech log mel-spectral energies,” in Proc. Int. Conf. on Spoken Language, Denver, CO, Sept. 2002. [14] D. Ealey, H. Kelleher, and D. Pearce, “Harmonic tunneling: Tracking nonstationary noise during speech,” in Proc. Eurospeech Conf., Aalborg, Denmark, Sept. 2001. [15] D. Ellis, W. Reyes, and M. Gomez, “Investigations into tandem acoustic modeling for the Aurora task,” in Proc. Eurospeech Conf., Aalborg, Den- mark, Sept. 2001. [16] R. Hamburgen, D. Wallach, M. Viredaz, L. Brakmo, C. Waldspurger, J. Bartlett, T. Mann, and K. Farkas, “Itsy: Stretch the bounds of mobile computing,” IEEE Computer, pp. 28–36, Apr. 2001. [17] H. G. Hirsch and D. Pearce, “The AURORA experimental framework for the performance evaluations of speech recognition systems under noisy conditions ,” in ISCA ITRW ASR2000 “Automatic Speech Recognition: Challenges for the Next Millennium”, Paris, France, Sept. 2000. [18] X. D. Huang et al., “MiPad: A next generation PDA prototype,” in Proc. Int. Conf. on Spoken Language Processing, Beijing, China, Oct. 2000. [19] X. D. Huang et al., “MiPad: A multimodal interaction prototype,” in Proc. Int. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, vol. I, Salt Lake City, UT, Apr. 2001, pp. 9–12. [20] D. Pearce, Ed., “ESE2 special sessions on noise robust recognition,” in Proc. Eurospeech Conf. Aalborg, Denmark, Sept. 2001. [21] R. Rose, S. Parthasarathy, B. Gajic, A. Rosenberg, and S. Narayanan, “On the implementation of ASR algorithm for hand-held wireless mo- bile devices,” in Proc. ICASSP, vol. I, Salt Lake City, UT, Apr. 2001. [22] J. Segura, A. Torre, M. Benitez, and A. Peinado, “Model-based compen- sation of the additive noise for continuous speech recognition: Experi- ments using the AURORA2 database and tasks,” in Proc. Eurospeech Conf., Aalborg, Denmark, Sept. 2001. [23] O. Viikki, Ed., Speech Communication (Special Issue on Noise Robust ASR), Apr. 2001, vol. 34. [24] O. Viikki, I. Kiss, and J. Tian, “Speaker and language independent speech recognition in mobile communication systems,” in Proc. Int. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, Salt Lake City, UT, May 2001. [25] Y. Wang, M. Mahajan, and X. Huang, “A unified context-free grammar and N-gram language model for spoken language processing,” in Proc. Int. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, Istanbul, Turkey, 2000. [26] Y. Wang, “A robust parser for spoken language understanding,” in Proc. Eurospeech Conf., Budapest, Hungary, 1999. [27] K. Wang, “Natural language enabled web applications,” in Proc. First NLP and XML Workshop, Tokyo, Japan, Nov. 2001. [7] [8] [11]

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, “Implementation of a multimodal dialog system using extended

markup language,” in Proc. Int. Conf. on Spoken Language Processing, Beijing, China, 2000.

Li Deng (S’83–M’86–SM’91) received the B.S. de- gree from the University of Science and Technology of China in 1982, the M.S. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1984, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Wis- consin-Madison in 1986. He worked on large vocabulary automatic speech recognition in Montreal, Canada, in 1986-1989. In 1989, he joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada as Assistent Professor; he became tenured Full Professor in 1996. From 1992 to 1993, he conducted sabbatical research at Laboratory for Computer Science, Massachusetts Insti- tute of Technology, Cambridge, and from 1997 to 1998, at ATR Interpreting Telecommunications Research Laboratories, Kyoto, Japan. In 1999, he joined Microsoft Research, Redmond, WA, as Senior Researcher, and is currently a principal investigator in the DARPA-EARS program and affiliate Professor of electrical engineering at University of Washington. His research interests include acoustic-phonetic modeling of speech, speech and speaker recognition, speech synthesis and enhancement, speech production and perception, auditory speech processing, noise robust speech processing, statistical methods and machine learning, nonlinear signal processing, spoken language systems, multimedia signal processing, and multimodal human-computer interaction. In these areas, he has published over 200 technical papers and book chapters, and has given keynote, tutorial, and other invited lectures worldwide. He recently completed the book Speech Processing—A Dynamic and Optimization-Ori- ented Approach.

Dr. Deng served on the Education Committee and Speech Processing Technical Committee of the IEEE Signal Processing Society during 1996-2000, and has, since Febuary 2002, been serving as Associate Editor for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SPEECH AND AUDIO PROCESSING.

Kuansan Wang received the B.S. degree from National Taiwan University in 1986, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Maryland at College Park in 1989 and 1994, respectively, all in electrical engineering. From 1994 to 1996, he was with the Speech Research Department at Bell Labs, Murray Hill, NJ. From 1996 to 1998, he was with speech and spoken language labs at NYNEX Science and Technology Center in White Plains, NY. Since 1988, he has been with speech technology group at Microsoft Research in Redmond WA. His research areas are speech recognition, spoken language understanding and multimodal dialog systems.

Alex Acero (S’83–M’90–SM’00) received an engineering degree from the Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain, in 1985, the M.S. degree from Rice University, Houston, TX, in 1987 and the Ph.D. degree from Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, in 1990, all in electrical engineering.

He was a Senior Voice Engineer at Apple Computer (1990–1991) and Man- ager of the Speech Technology Group at Telefonica Investigacion y Desarrollo (1991–1993). He joined Microsoft Research, Redmond, WA, in 1994, where he is currently Manager of the Speech Group. He is also Affiliate Professor at the University of Washington, Seattle, WA. He is author of the books Spoken Language Processing (Upper Saddle River, NJ, Prentice-Hall, 2000) and Acous- tical and Environmental Robustness in Automatic Speech Recognition (Boston, MA, Kluwer, 1993). He also has written chapters in three edited books, seven patents and over 50 other publications. His research interests include noise ro- bustness, speech synthesis, signal processing, acoustic modeling, statistical lan- guage modeling, spoken language processing, speech-centric multimodal inter- faces, and machine learning. He is associate editor of Compute , Speech, and Language.

Dr. Acero served in the IEEE Signal Processing Society’s Speech Technical Committee as member (1996–2000) and chair (2000–2002). He was general co-chair of the 2001 IEEE Workshop on Automatic Speech Recognition and Understanding, sponsorship chair of the 1999 IEEE Workshop on Automatic Speech Recognition and Understanding, and publications chair of ICASSP ’98.

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