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MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW.

JUNE, 1896

high, observed on the 10th in the position given, was about the normal southern liniit, and the ..asternmost ice reported, a berg observed on the 18th, in the position given, was about one-half of a degree west of the normal eastern liniit of ice for June. MOVEMENT O F CENTERS. The following table shows the date and location of the cen- ter for the beginning and ending of each area of high or low pressure that has appeared on the U. S. weather inaps during the month, together with the average daily and hourly veloci- TEMPERATURE OF THE AIR. ties. The monthly averages are coniputed in two ways ; first, giving The mean temperature only is given for each station in Table 11,for voluntary observers, but in Table I, both the mean temperatures and the departures from the normal are given for the current month for all the regular stations of the Weather Bureau. The monthly mean tewqierature published in Table I, for the regular stations of the Weather Bureau, is the simple mean of all the daily masinia a i d minima ; for voluntary stations a variety of methods of computation is necessarily allowed, as shown by the notes appended to Table 11. The distribution of the monthly mean temperature of the a h over the United States and Canada is shown by the dotted isotherms on Chart 11; the lines are drawn over the high ...... irregular surface of the Rocky Mountain plateau, although the temperatures have not been reduced to sea level, and the isotherms, therefore, relate to the average surface of the country occupied by our observers ; such isotherms are con- trolled largely by the local topography, and should be drawn and studied in connection with a contour map. The reyulnr diurnal period iu temperature is shown by the hourly means given in Table I V for all stations having self- registers. AY comnpnred with the ~oriita for June, the mean temper- atures for the current month were in excess over the whole of the United States east of the Mississippi River, except in the east Gulf States. The greatest excesses were : RockliRe, 6.4; Port Stanley, 6.2 ; Toronto, 5.9 ; Rochester, 5.6. They were deficient over the Rocky Mountain slope and plateau region, the greatest deficits were : Miles City, 6.4 ; Qu'Appelle, 6.9 ; Lander, 5.5 ; Bismarck, 5.2 ; Williston, 6.1. Considwed by districts, the mean temperatures for the cur- rent nionth show departures from normal temperatures as given in Table I. The greatest positive departure was : Lower by considering equal weight to each each path as a unit, and day of observation : second, by - g a " w M U . ? & 6 7 8 l , w i U o v e m % n t o f c e n t e r a o f a r e a a o f h i g h m i d l o P o p r s c r s u r e . M i i l e a . 2 4 . 1 . . . . . . I 6 F =i l r s t - o b s e r v e d . M e a n o f 2 4 . 6 p 26.7 24.4 U.6 a t h 640 505 5W s . . 4.0 7.5 7.5 . . . - 24.5 5,3!W 5w 592 Sums ............................. Mean of 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 , p . m . 7 . p . m . l 2 . p . m . 2 7 . p . m . 7 , 8 8 0 M e a n o r 1 7 . 5 p a t h s . . L a s t o b s e r v e d . I P a t h . . . . - . . . 24.9 24.8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 4 . 5 days.. 5.5 8.0 a. o 7.0 20.7 16.9 24.9 15.1 496 406 5n 888 6 8 I I - D a y 8 5 . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I ................ II............... III.............. IV ............. 65 91 92 76 47 49 88 47 2,780 1,818 1,194 %St3 - - .................... Sums.............................. Mean of 4 17.5 . . . 465 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .........I .....I......1........I ..... 19.4 . / I / I . . . . . . . . . I . . . . . I . . . . . . I . . . . . . . . I . . . . . days............................ I 8.' NORTH ATLANTIC METEOROLOGY. Fog.-The limits of fog6elts west of the fortieth meridian, on Chart I by dotted as reported by shipmasters, are shading. shown East of the fifty-fifth meridian fogwas reported on 32dates ; between the fifty-fifth and sixty-fifth meridians on 20 dates, and west of the sixty-fifth meridian on 22 dates. Compared with the corresponding month of the last seven years, the dates of occurrence of fog east of the fifty-fifth meridian numbered 11more than the average; between the fifty-fifth and sixty-fifth meridians, 7 more than the average ; and west Lake, 4.1. slope, 4.4. The greatest negative departure waa : Northern The yeaw of highest and lowest mean temperature for June are ahown in Table I of the REVIE for June, 1894. The mean temperature for the current nionth was the highest on record a t : Northfield, 66.3; Albany, 72.6 ; Rochester, 70.7 ; Buffalo, 6Y.8; Harrisburg, 73.4 ; Pittshurg, 74.7 ; Columbus, Ohio, 74.9 ; o f t h e s i x t y - f i f t h m e r i d i a n , 7 m o r e t h a n t h e a v e r a g e . F o g w a s n o t e d o n e v e r y d a y o f 18th. t h e m o n t h , e x c e p t t h e 3 d , 1 7 t h , a n d OCEAN I C E FOR JUNE. It Sacramento, 72.9. the lowest record Vin- St. at: was on The following table shows the southern and eastern limits of the regions within which icebergs or field ice were reported for June during the last thirteen years : cent. 58.2 ; Moorhead, 61.4; Idaho Falls, 56.8 ; Lander, 61.5; Pueblo, 66.2; El Paso, Miles 56.3 ; 77.5. City, 60.6; Cheyenne, Helena, 66.6; 56.8; Denver,

Southern limit.

I1

Eastern limlt.

Month.

Lat. N.

Long. W. --

Month.

Lat. N. Long.w.

June,1890.. ............

40 01

June 1891..............

40 15

June 1888..............

40 28

June:lW..............

41 42

June.1885.. ...........

39 38

June 1866..............

40 90

June:1687..............

4U 40

June, 1 8 8 8 . . ............ June,lM9..............

43 8A

43 54

or

June:1W.. ............

41 44

June 1844............. June,1898..............

I 08

40 10

June: 1895.. ............

41 08

Mean ............

41 09

51 45 4i 49 48 12 5a00 48a 43 24 49 M 52 00 50 W 50 40 55 19 57 80 51 10

June 1889............. June: 1884............ June.1885............ June 1886............. June:lW7............. June;lW............. June, 1889............. June,l890* ........... June 1801............. June'lssZ ............. June'1893............. June:18M............. June,181M.............

48 14 4400 45 14 49 15 48 22 43 s8 40 67 I 08 44 16 45 50 47 ZO 49 a 50 80

42 48 45B 41 12 4000 39 19 43 '31 4029 37 07 43 4i 40 46 44 19 36 80 I 51

5035

Mean ............

46 38

41 21

or

or

1.

The limits of the region within which icebergs or field ice were reported for June, 1896,are shown on Chart I by crosses. 'The southernmost ice reported, a berg 200 feet long by 50 feet

The rnuxinmm and nainimunb temnperattcres of the current month are given in Table I. The highest maxima were: Yuma and Fresno, 109 (33d) ; Red Bluff, 105 (23d); Tucson, 106 (26th). The lowest maxima were: Tatoosh Island, 71 (27th); Neali Bay, 74 (27th). The highest minima were: Port Eads, 75 (let) ; Galveston, 72 (21st) ; Corpus Christi, 70 (6th) ; the lowest minima were: Baker City, 28 (16th) ; Idaho Falls, 28 (1Sth) ; Lander, 29 (18th) ; Carson City, 30 (38th).

The years of highest maximum and lotueRt aiiniiuzcm tempera- tures are given in the last four columns of Table I of the cur- rent REVIEW. During the present month the maximum temperatures were the highest on record at: Nantucket, 89; Woods Hole, 85; ButYalo, 93; Port Huron, 95; Detroit, 96; Grand Haven, 90; Columbus, Ohio, 99; Pittsburg, 98; Har- risburg, 97 ; Parlrersburg, 99 ; Indianapolis, 100; Louisville, 100; Knoxville, 96; Cape Henry, 99; Hatteras, 91; Wil- mington, 100; Columbia, 8. C., 102; Titusville, 95; Con- cordia, 101; Wichita, 101; Port Angeles, 82. The minimum

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