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thought that she was being abandoned. A mother described the aggressiveness of the child(ren) towards her after having spent the weekend with the non-residential father but still accepted that (s)he enjoyed being with him. Another parent spoke of the light in the child’s eyes when she knows she is going to see the other parent and the melancholy that she seems to suffer afterwards.

None of this is remarkable in the realms of separated families. More noteworthy is the ability of residential parents to objectively recognise both the need for their child(ren) to have contact with the other parent, even when the child(ren) has

previously enjoyment residential abduction. anxiety on

been abducted by that of these occasions.

parent, as well as the child’s That is not to say that the

parent does not think about, Many parents spoke in terms this matter and, even though they

or fear, a further of their continued did not believe that

it would actually happen, they spoke of their thought of re-abduction out of their minds.

inability

to

put

the

  • 3.

    The Effects

    • (i)

      The Child(ren):

This issue was approached in this part of the research from the perspective of the parent being interviewed. We were trying to identify whether, how often, and in which way the child(ren) spoke to that parent about the abduction and the events which occurred during the time that (s)he was away, and whether that parent felt that the abduction had had an effect on the child(ren). Where that parent did feel that the abduction had affected the child(ren), we tried to identify the areas in which that effect is thought to have occurred.

The concern with this line of questioning is that the left-behind parent being interviewed may associate all problems and

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