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12 / 21

Newark Public Schools

All

No

Most

94.0

Detroit Public Schools

All

No

Most

84.6

Boston Public Schools

Partial

Yes

Some

68.7

Columbus City Schools

All

No

Some

61.0

Pittsburgh Public Schools

All

Yes

None

60.8

San Diego Unified School District

Partial

Yes

Some

60.0

Minneapolis Public Schools

All

No

Some

57.2

Milwaukee Public Schools

Partial

No

Most

56.9

Houston Independent School District

All

No

Most

56.2

Los Angeles Unified School District

Partial

Yes

Some

56.1

Atlanta Public Schools

Partial

No

Some

55.7

Philadelphia School District

All

No

Some

55.6

Cleveland Metropolitan School District

All

Yes

None

55.3

District of Columbia Public Schools

All

Yes

Some

48.4

Memphis City Schools

All

No

Some

48.2

Omaha Public Schools

All

Yes

Some

47.4

Seattle Public Schools

None

No

None

46.8

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

None

No

Some

45.6

Baltimore City Public Schools

All

Yes

Some

44.7

Little Rock School District

None

No

None

44.4

Prince George’s Co. Public Schools (MD)

Partial

No

Some

43.1

Chicago Public Schools

All

No

Some

43.0

Dallas Independent School District

None

No

Some

39.6

Denver Public Schools

All

Yes

Some

38.6

Miami-Dade County Public Schools

All

No

None

37.4

Orange County Public Schools

Partial

Yes

Some

35.1

New York City Dept. of Education

All

Yes

Some

34.1

Oakland Unified School District

Partial

Yes

Some

32.0

Clark County School District (NV)

Partial

Yes

None

29.4

  • *

    In this chart “breakfast in the classroom” also includes “grab and go” and breakfast after first period

Table 4 summarizes results from the cities FRAC surveyed on universal (free for all) and in-classroom breakfast programs (including all the alternative service methods described above). Twenty-three of the 29 school districts have at least some schools that are offering breakfast after the school day begins, usually providing it during the first ten minutes of class time. Newark Public Schools and Detroit Public Schools reach the largest percentage of low-income students by requiring classroom breakfast in all K–8 schools. Houston was in the process of implementing classroom breakfast in all K–8 schools during the 2009–2010 school year, and completed district- wide implementation in fall 2010.

Table 4: Universal Breakfast and Breakfast in the Classroom*

Universal

Provision

Breakfast

2

School Districts

Breakfast In the Classroom*

Ratio of low- income students eating breakfast compared to lunch

Food Research and Action Center

School Breakfast in America’s Big Cities

13

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