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I. Single Leg Med-Ball Balance Drill - page 2 / 2

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paz

2.

Stand

on

one leg

and,

using

both hands,

hold

high overhead

a

medicine

ball

weighing

five

to ten

pounds. This

is the

position shown

in

Figure 2(a). From this position, pull down with a full body-chopping motion, throwing the ball to the floor at a 45-degree angle, as illustrated in Figure 2(b). You can bounce the ball off a solid wall, or you can alternate with a partner standing about 10 feet away.

Make sure to pull the ball down with the whole body, and not to flick it

with the wrists and hands. The you pull downward in an six-to-eight reps per leg and progressively heavier balls.

knee of your supporting leg should flex as

explosive work our

movement. We like way up through three

to

use

or

four

Remember to take your time and increase your sets, weight, and reps gradually over time. This is a ballistic movement and you must condition yourself to it gradually ..

011 a Stalbllify

Fig.2(a)

Every athlete should own a stability ($35-40) and invaluable.

ball. They're

inexpensive

Using both hands as a tripod, roll into the kneeling position on a 65cm, fully-inflated stability ball. This is the position shown in Figure 3(a-c). Keep your hands on the ball until you feel you can let go. This may take several attempts over several days. Once you are able to kneel using no hands, attempt to get into an upright position. Once you have mastered this position, we like to see the athlete build time in this position, anywhere from one to five minutes depending upon ability.

This is one of my personal favorites as it not only works balance and stabilization, but works the adductors of the inner thigh a ton! Once you are able to sustain the upright position, mix it up by playing catch with a nerf football with someone. If you can manage 20 throws back and forth

without falling, mechanics.

you'll

have great balance

within

your pitching

Regarding core strength, stabilization, and balance, balancing on the stability ball gives us more bang for the buck than any other move we do. We also have several movements we will use in conjunction with the

stability ball balancing act that take this move to an even more difficult level.

Fig.2(b)

Take your time and try to feel all of these movements and the areas they are designed to work. Be patient, and the time you have spent on these Balance and Stabilization exercises will pay huge dividends on the pitching mound. 0

Note: This article is the second in a new series concept of balance. The first part on Upper Body Readers may also be interested in reviewing Dan in our Summer 2000, Fall 2000 and Holiday

www.hardball.netorbycalling

1-888-732-MSBL.

focused on resistance conditioning Resistance Training appeared in the

and the

critical

Fall 2003

issue.

Potts' 2000

3-part series on Body issues. Back issues

Core

Strength

are

available

published online at

Fig.3(a)

Fig.3(b)

Fig.3c)

Holiday 2003

HardBall Magazine

11

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