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MARCH Outcome Evaluation

The MARCH intervention significantly improved individual’s condom self-efficacy but not outcome expectancy [in Addis Ababa]

Overall, individual’s perceived efficacy to use condom was positively and significantly correlated with exposure to the MARCH. The proportion that held high self-efficacy level in relation to condom use ranged from 48.5% among the non-exposed to 61.9% and 60%, respectively, among the moderately-and highly-exposed respondents.

Although overall self-efficacy of individuals has improved as a result of participating in the MARCH, it appeared that the intervention has significantly improved the perceived self-efficacy of females, currently married and those aged over 25 years.  While little or no change was noted in condom self-efficacy scores by exposure status for the male, never married and young respondents (aged 15-24 years).

Both condom use outcome expectancy and future intention to use condom (i.e. in the next 3 months) did not show any significant correlation with exposure to the MARCH. In general, respondents who were exposed to the MARCH did not significantly differ in their perceived levels of outcome expectancy as well as in their future intention to use condom compared to the non-exposed.

Although overall reported intention to use condom (in the next 3 months) did not improve as a result of participating in the MARCH, it appeared that the intervention has improved, though not significantly, the likely intentions of female, never married and young people (aged 15-24). While no difference in the reported intentions to use condom by exposure to the MARCH was noted for the other group of respondents.  

The MARCH intervention significantly improved both individual’s self-efficacy and outcome expectancy in relation to HIV testing [in Addis Ababa]

The perceived efficacy and positive outcome expectancy in relation to HIV testing were positively and significantly correlated with exposure to the MARCH intervention. Respondents’ future intention to test for HIV (i.e. in the next 3 months) also showed significant and positive association with exposure to the MARCH intervention. The proportion of respondents that scored above the median in the HIV testing self-efficacy score (i.e. high HIV testing self-efficacy level) ranged from 34.4% to 49% and 59.5%, respectively, for the non-, moderately-and highly-exposed respondents.  While about 50.1% of the non-exposed demonstrated high positive outcome expectancy in relation to HIV testing, the corresponding proportions for the moderately-and highly-exposed respondents were 61.3% and 62.1%, respectively.

The effect of the MARCH on individual’s perceived self-efficacy and outcome expectancy in relation to HIV testing varies in accordance with the sex, age and marital status. It appeared that the MARCH intervention has significantly improved the self-efficacy of female, currently married and those aged 25 year or higher. While no significant differences in the perceived HIV testing self-efficacy levels were noted by exposure to the MARCH for the males, young and the never

Addis Ababa and West Hararghe

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