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MARCH Outcome Evaluation

Table 11. Multivariate Logistic regression adjusted Odds Ratios [OR] in the estimation of high median scores on the scales measuring condom self-efficacy among sexually active respondents according to respondents’ characteristics in Addis Ababa, MARCH outcome survey, May-June 2005

High condom self-efficacy

OR

Exposure to MARCH

     [Not at all]

    Moderately exposed

    Highly exposed

Sex

  [Female]

  Male

Age

  [15-19]

  20-24

  25-29

  30+

Education

   [Cannot read/write]

   Read/write only [Non-formal education]

   1-8 grade

   9-12 grade

   12+

Marital status

  [Never married]

  Currently married

  Divorced/Widowed

1

1.6*

2.6*

1

2.7***

1

0.8

0.8

0.4

1

0.9

2.0

3.8**

4.2*

1

0.4*

0.7

Reference Category in parenthesis

*p<0.05 **p<0.01 ***p<0.001

Further stratification of the levels of perceived self-efficacy scores by respondents’ age and sex revealed that the MARCH intervention appeared to significantly improve the perceived self-efficacy of females, currently married and those aged over 25 years (Figure 3a).  While little or no change was noted in condom self-efficacy scores by exposure status for the male, never married and young respondents (aged 15-24 years). Indeed, as shown in Figure 3a, the perceived mean scores of condom self-efficacy were higher for the non-exposed males (3.6) than non-exposed females (1.8), the non-exposed never married (3.9) than non-exposed currently married (2.2) and the non-exposed youth (3.6) than non-exposed adults (2.1). Thus, it appeared that the MARCH intervention has positively influenced the perceived self-efficacy

Addis Ababa and West Hararghe

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