X hits on this document

69 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

17 / 27

16

SECTION 1

Early Intervention and Public Policy

programs to go around.Investing public money in segregated rather than inclusive facilities should be seen as a setback—philosophically and nancially—in meet- ing the developmental needs of all children.

SUPPORTING INCLUSION: IMPLICATIONS FOR TEACHERS

The mere act of placing children with and without disabilities together in a class- room does not ensure successful inclusion. “Inclusion depends on teachers’ at- titudes towards pupils with special needs, on their capacity to enhance social relations, on their view on differences in classrooms and their willingness to deal with those differences effectively” (Skipper, 2006. Pg 9). Particular skills are needed to facilitate successful interactions. Many of these skills stem from knowl- edge of child development, as discussed in Chapter 4; the other skills are discussed in detail under various headings throughout the text. Effective inclusion requires specic planning and implementation by teachers, whose responsibilities include:

  • 0

    individualizing programs and activities to meet each child’s specic needs and abilities.

    • 0

      arranging a highly engaging learning environment that encourages appro- priate behavior.

    • 0

      recognizing that all children belong and that although a specic behavior may be inappropriate in a particular setting, the goal is to support the child in learning a more appropriate alternative for that behavior.

    • 0

      recognizing the value of play as a major avenue of learning for all children; at the same time, recognizing that play skills often have to be taught to children with disabilities, many of whom neither know how to play nor play spontaneously.

    • 0

      arranging a balance of large- and small-group experiences, both vigorous and quiet, so that all children, at their own levels, can be active and interac- tive participants.

    • 0

      structuring a learning environment in which children with and without dis- abilities are helped to participate together in a variety of activities related to all areas of development.

    • 0

      creating a nurturing environment by providing a curriculum that empha- sizes friendship, caring, and respect for diversity.

    • 0

      assessing children’s progress periodically and using this information to adjust curriculum and instruction.

    • 0

      providing a exible curriculum by making adjustments to the instruction and environment to address children’s needs.

    • 0

      supporting the development of all children by creating a learning and playing environment that includes a range of materials and activities such that the lowest-functioning children can be independent and the highest- functioning children are challenged.

    • 0

      collaborating with other team member (i.e., speech therapists, parents, occu- pational therapists, paraprofessionals) regarding progress and intervention.

Document info
Document views69
Page views69
Page last viewedWed Dec 07 19:31:59 UTC 2016
Pages27
Paragraphs455
Words10615

Comments